Roads S – T

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Sandpiper Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2002

SP 514781

Common Sandpiper, Actitis hypoleucos

The common sandpiper is a freshwater wader that is a summer visitor to Britain, where it breeds widely throughout Scotland, Wales, northern England and Northern Ireland.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Sarawak Place

Cawston, off Gold Avenue

2004

SP 476736

Sarawak is one of two states in the Federation of Malaysia on the island of Borneo.

Sarawak is in the North West of Borneo. From 1841 to 1946 it was governed by a ‘White’ Rajah. It was a British Crown Colony from 1946 to 1963, when it became a founding member of the Malaysian Federation.

Princess Gold, the eldest daughter of the then Rajah of Sarawak, became in 1933 the second wife of the 2nd Earl of Inchcape (1887-1939). They lived in Cawston House until 1937. (see also Gold Avenue.)

Saunton Road

Bilton, Overslade Estate, off Mellish Road

1948

SP 494742

Saunton, Devon

Saunton is a village close to the North Devin coast about 2 miles from Braunton, and about 8 miles north east of Barnstaple.

Saunton Road is another road in Overslade that was named after a golf course. Saunton is listed as one of the best courses in the UK.

Saxon Close

Cawston, off Cawston Grange Drive

2002

SP 472735

The first inhabitants of Cawston were Saxons.

The Saxons were a group of Germanic tribes that were first mentioned as living near the North Sea coast in the Roman empire.

The Saxons settled in England during the fifth century following the collapse of the Roman empire.

Scafell

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1982

SP 516774

 

Scafell, Cumbria

 

Scafell is a mountain in the Southern Fells of the Lake District. The height of 3,162 feet (964 m) of its summit makes it the second highest mountain in England, with only its neighbour, Scafell Pike at 3,209 feet (978 m) being higher.

Scafell is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

 

Scholars Drive

Cawston, off Gerards Road

2004

SP 474738

Cawstin Grange Primary School

Scholars Drive leads to the entrance to the school

The land on which the school was built was formerly part of Cawston Grange.

The Grange was owned by the moks of Pipewell (see also Cawston Grange Drive).

School Street

Rugby

 

     

See Lawrence Sheriffe Street

Seabroke Avenue

Rugby, off Lawford Road

c1919

SP 496451

George Mitchell Seabroke (c1848 – 1918)

Solicitor (1870 – 1918), Clerk to the Justices for Rugby Petty Sessional Division (1871 – 1918), Chief Officer of Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade (1875 – 1918), a member of Board of Health & the Urban District Council (1875 – 1900).

Some time after 1891, Seabroke moved to ‘Rosemount’, a large house in Lawford Road situated opposite to the present junction with Seabroke Avenue.

Seathwaite

 

Brownsover, off Ennerdale

 

1975

 

 

SP 513774

 

Seathwaite, Cumbria

 

There are two places in Cumbria named Seathwaite, both situated in the Lake District National Park. There is a hamlet named Seathwaite in the civil parish of Borrowdale. Further south in the Duddon Valley there is a village with the same name which is in the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite.

Seathwaite is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish of Borrowdale was 417 and the population of the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite was 119.

 

Selside

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

 

SP 517774

 

Selside, Cumbria

 

Selside is a village in South Lakeland, about 6 miles north of Kendal.It is just within the border of the National Park

 

This is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Selside is now within the civil parish of Whitwell and Selside which in the 2011 Census had a population of 296.

Sessile Oak Close

Brownsover, off Juniper Way

2020

SP 508780

Sessile Oak. Quercus petraea

The sessile oak is a deciduous broad-leaf tree native to the UK and most of Europe. Its acorns are carried directly on its outer twigs, unlike the English oak, Quercus ruba, whose acorns are on stalks.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Shakespeare Gardens

Rugby, off Dunchurch Road

1959

SP 497733

William Shakespeare (1564 – 1616)

Poet and dramatist. As a playwright he has a world-wide reputation.

In 1740 a memorial to Shakespeare was erected in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

William Shakespeare was born at Stratford-upon-Avon. He was buried in Holy Trinity, the parish church of Stratford-upon-Avon.

Shapfell

 

Brownsover, off Scafell

 

1982

SP 518774

 

Shap Fell, Cumbria

 

Shap Fell is a mountainous area about 14 miles south of Penrith. The A6 road crosses Shap Fell at 1,397 feet above sea level. Before the opening of the M6 in 1970, the A6 was the main north-south route from north west England to Scotland and often had notoriously bad road conditions during winter.

 

Shapfell is one of the roads in Brownsover  that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park

 

Shaughnessy Way

Houlton, off Maine Street

2018

SP 555739

Edward H Shaughnessy OBE, MIEE, MIRE.(1871-1942)

He worked for the Post Office from 1887 to 1931. He became Staff Engineer-in-Charge of the Radio Section in 1913. He became a member of the Wireless Telegraphy Commission that was deeply involved with the design of Rugby Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Shearwater Drive

Brownsover, off Nightingale Gardens

2003

SP 514781

Manx Shearwater, Puffinus puffinus

Shearwaters are pelagic seabirds of the family Procellariidae. The British birds normally breed on inshore islands along the western coast of Britain and around Ireland.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

As shearwaters are pelagic, they spend most of their life out at sea and only come to land for breeding.

Sheep Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

 

This was at the historic centre of the town in which a livestock market was held.

 

The livestock market was held in this street until 1870, when it was moved to Reynolds Field, a piece of the glebe land leased from the Rector of St Andrews Church.

Sheep Street became one-way for traffic in 1938 and pedestrianised in 1994.

Sheridan Close

Rugby, Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

SP 498731

Richard Brinsley Sheridan (1751 – 1816)

Irish playwright and politician. He has been described as the greatest comic dramatist of modern times. He later became a Whig MP at Westminster (1780 -1812)

He is best known today as the author of the comic plays, The Rivals and The School for Scandal.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Sheriff Road

Rugby, off Eastlands Road

1926

SP 517750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 – 67)

see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567.

It is presumed that this road is another reminder of this famous Rugbeian.

Shuckburgh Crescent

 

Hillmorton, off Balcombe Road

 

1937

SP 518735

 

Lower Shuckburgh

 

Lower Shuckburgh is a small village in eastern Warwickshire near to Napton on the Hill.

 

A little to the south of Lower Shuckburgh is the deserted village of Upper Shuckburgh. Shuckburgh is of Saxon origin and is mentioned in the Domesday Book as Socheberge, meaning a ‘hill or mound haunted by an evil spirit’.

Sidney Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 521741

Sidney John Dicksee (1855 – 1922)

Sidney Dicksee was the head of the well known building and contracting firm of Foster & Dicksee of Rugby and London. He was also president of the Rugby Freehold Land Society (1920-22);

Sidney Road was a development on Brown’s Farm Estate, near the Paddox by the Rugby Freehold Land Society. The road was named by the Society to perpetuate the memory of their recently deceased president.

Sidney Wolfe Road

Cawston, off Richard Walker Way

2018

SP 472731

Sidney George Wolfe (1890-1917)

Sidney Wolfe was a pupil at Elborow School (1897-1906), a pupil-teacher at the Lower School of Lawrence Sheriff (1906-08) and eventually returned to Elborow School as an Assistant Teacher (1912-14). He enlisted in the Army in 1914 and was killed in action in 1917, having risen through the ranks to become a 1st Lieutenant.

The Names of the roads adjoining Elborow Way, Cawston, are all associated with the former Elorow Charity School, the ‘second oldest school in Rugby’.

Signalman Court

Rugby, off Barnaby Road

2017

SP 504765

“The Signalman.”

The Signalman is a horror mystery syory written and published by Charles Dickens in 1866.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Siskin Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2002

SP 514778

Siskin, Carduelis spinus

The Siskin is a small resident finch in Britain, breeding primarily in afforested areas, particularly conifer plantations.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Skiddaw

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1976

SP 513774

 

Skiddaw, Cumbria

 

Skiddaw is a mountain just north of Keswick. At 3,054 feet it has the sixth highest summit in England.

Skiddaw is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Somers Road

New Bilton, off Addison Road

 1960s

SP 490753

Sgt. James Somers VC (1893 – 1918)

Sgt Somers was briefly billeted with Mr & Mrs William Burn at 16, Corbett Street, Rugby, early in 1915. After his investiture in 1915 at Buckingham Palace he revisited Rugby and received a civic welcome.

Somers Road is part of an industrial estate and has no residential properties.

James Somers came from Clough-Jordan, Tipperary and was in the 1st Inniskilling Fusiliers. He was awarded the Victoria Cross in 1915 for gallantry in holding a trench against overwhelming odds at the Dardanelles.

Somers Road was erected on the site of the former Newland’s Farm that was farmed at that time by Mr Upton.

Sorrel Drive

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1990

SP 517772

Sorrel, Rumex acetosa

Sorrel, also called common sorrel or garden sorrel, is a perennial herbaceous plant. It is native to Eurasia and is common in grassland habitats.

Aorrel Drive is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Southbrook Road

Rugby, Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1941

SP 500741

Sow Brook

South Brook is an alternative name for the more generally accepted Sow Brook. The brook runs through the land on which the Rokeby Estate was built.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm. (see also Belmont Road).

 

Southey Road

Rugby, off Macaulay Road

1959

SP 494733

Robert Southey (1774 – 1843)

Southey was a poet and reviewer and another of the main figures of a group of poets who lived in the Lake District at the turn of the nineteenth century who were called the Lake Poets. He was Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1813 until his death in 1843.

His memorial is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Southey was also a prolific letter writer, literary scholar, essay writer, historian and biographer. His biographies include those for John Bunyan, John Wesley, William Cowper, Oliver Cromwell and Horatio Nelson, with the latter probably his best known.

Southfield Road

Rugby, off Cromwell Road

1932

SP 510743

Southfield Farm

Southfield Road was built on the former Southfield Farm (or Lodge).

Southfield Farm was sold by its owner, Mrs E D Miller, for residential development following the death of her husband in 1930.

Southwell Drive

Houlton, off Ripon Drive

2023

SP 550736

Cathedral and Parish Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary at Southwell in Nottinghamshire.

The earliest church at Southwell is believed to have been founded in 627. The church was originally attached to the Archbishop of York’s Palce which stood next door and is now ruined. It served the archbishop as a place of worship and was a collegiate body of theological learning, hence its designation as a minster.

Southwell Drive is one of a group of roads in the south of Houlton that were named after monasteries or minsters of the English church, that were founded mainly when the Anglo-Saxons were converted to Christianity in the seventh and eighth centuries.

Southwell later became the Cathedral for Nottinghamshire and part of Derbyshire.

Speedwell Close

Brownsover, off Campion Way,

1990

SP 519775

Soeedwell, one of several species in the genus Veronica.

The speedwell are perennial flowers in the genus Veronica. Slender speedwell (Veronica filiformis) was introduced to Britain from Turkey and the Caucasus during the early 19th century and is now a native in British grasslands.

Speedwell Close is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Spicer Place

Bilton, off Bilton Road

1973

SP 486741

Walter Harold Spicer (1890 – 1965)

He was the Engineer and Surveyor to Rugby Borough Council from 1930 to 1950 when he retired.

During his employment from 1921 to 1950 in the Engineering Department of the Borough Council (and its predecessor the Rugby Urban District Council), he had also been their Water Engineer and Gas Examiner.

Walter Spicer died at his home in Hampden Way, Bilton.

Spicer Place was built on the site of Bilton Rise, a large Victorian house with extensive grounds.

Spinney Lane

Brownsover, off Lower Lodge Avenue

2013

SP 511779

A spinney is a small wood or copse.

A spinney is where many of the trees named in the adjoining roads may be found.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Spottiswood Close

Cawston, off Gerard Road

2002

SP 473736

Alicia Anne Spottiswoode (1810-1900)

Alicia was a Scottish songwriter and composer. Today she is chiefly known as the composer of the tune for “Annie Laurie”.

(see also Alicia Close.)

In 1836, Alicia married the Rt. Hon. John Douglas Montagu-Douglas-Scott, who, in 1827, had inherited the Buccleuch estates in the Dunchurch area, including Cawston, which became their chief residence.

Although her surname is spelt by most authorities as ‘Spottiswoode’, the close has always been spelt without the final ‘e’.

Spruce Close

Brownsover, off Magnolia Avenue

2020

SP 508779

Norway Spruce, Picea ables

The Norway spruce is an evergreen coniferous tree. It is the original Christmas tree.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Stacey Court

Bilton, off Arden Close

1984

SP 489725

Albert Montague Stacey (1907-1978)

Mr Stacey was Borough Treasurer for 25 years from 1945 to 1970 when he retired, Previously he had been deputy treasurer for ten years.

Stacey Court is a retirement housing complex managed by the Borough Council.

Stanley Road

Hillmorton, off Hillmorton Road

1983

SP 520741

Edward Marmaduke Stanley MA (1808-1891)

The Rev EM Stanley was the vicar of Hillmorton St John (1864-1889). He attended Rugby School from 1816 to 1828. He matriculated at Worcester College, Oxford University. He was awarded his BA in 1833and his MA in 1836

Stanley Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

He was born at Rugby, where his father was an assistant master at Rugby School. On his retirement from the Hillmorton living he removed himself to Horton Street (now Horton Crescent) where he subsequently died.

 

Station Avenue

Houlton, off Houlton Way

2022

SP 549736

Station Avenue leads to the ‘C’ Building of the former Rugby Radio Station.

The ‘C’ Building was the orginal 1926 building. It is now a Grade II listed building and has become part of Houlton School, a co-educational secondary and sixth form school.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and many of its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Station Road

Rugby

       

See Railway Terrace

Staveley Way

 

Brownsover, off Crowthorns

 

1993

SP 518768

 

Staveley, Cumbria

 

Staveley is a village in the South Lakeland District of Cumbria about 4 miles northwest of Kendal.and about 4 miles east of Windermere. It is split between the civil parishes of Nether Staveley and Over Staveley.

 

Staveley Way is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Staveley had a population of 1,147 at the 2011 Census.

There is also a small village named Staveley-in-Cartmel which is also in the Lake District and is near to the south end of Windermere. In the 2011 Census it had a population of 405.

Staverton Leys

off Orson Leys

1970

SP 500731

Staverton a village near to Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The Old English name for Staverton was Stӕfertun, meaning a ‘farmstead made of or marked by stakes’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Steele Street

New Bilton, off Addison Road

1935

SP 490751

Richard Steele (1672 – 1729)

He was an Irish writer and politician, who co-founded with his friend, Joseph Addison, the Tatler magazine in 1709 and The Spectator magazine in 1711.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison’s contemporaries because it was near to Addison Road.

Stonechat Road

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2003

SP 515782

Stonechat, Motocilla torquata

The stone chat is a small member of the Turidae family which contains thrushes and chats. It is resident in Britain, mostly in western coastal areas.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Stonehills

 

Brownsover, off Crow Thorns

 

1973

SP 511770

 

Stonehills Tarn, Cumbria

 

Stonehills tarn is an artificial tarn, privately owned, near Winster, southeast of Bowness-on-Windermere. It has the alternative name of Barrow Plantation Tarn.

 

Stonehills is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Stonehills Tarn covers about 3 acres and has a maximum depth of 6½ feet.

St Annes Road

 

Bilton, off Lytham Road

 

c.1939

SP 489742

 

Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire.

The road developers, David Mitchell and his associates, named it after one of their favourite golf courses. (see also Lytham Road.)

The Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club was founded in 1886 and the present course constructed in 1897. It is one of the world’s premier links courses, having hosted many major tournaments including eleven open championships.

St Andrews Street

Rugby

       

See Regent Street

St Gabriels Way

Houlton, off Houlton Way

2018

SP 556734

 St Gabriel’s Primary School.

St Gabriels Way leads to St Gabriel’s Primary School.

St Gabriel is the patron saint of communication.

The residential develpment of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were  associated with it and the further development of radio.

St Georges Avenue

 

Rugby, off Kingsway

 

1951

 

SP 500740

 

St George (about 278-303)

 

St George is the patron saint of England. He was reputed to be a Roman soldier of Greek origin who was sentenced to death for failing to give up his Christian belief.

 

Although St Georges Avenue was built after St George’s Church, it is unlikely to be named after the church, as it is not within the parish area, which is centered around Hillmorton Paddox. The church was dedicated to St George in September 1940.

St Johns Avenue

 

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Fareham Avenue

1931

SP 520738

 

St John’s Church, Hillmorton

 

Although St Johns Avenue is about a mile in distance from St John’s Church, it was then within the parish boundaries of this church.

Today (2017) the avenue is within the new parish of Rugby St George. The parish Church of St George’s was built in 1960 in St Johns Avenue.

St John Street

 

Rugby, off Newbold Road

 

c 1856

SP 501754

 

St John’s Chapel

 

St John Street was named after the chapel which was built for Evangelical Christians in 1845.

 

The life of the chapel was short lived as it was first offered for sale in 1851 and then converted into four cottages abutting on to the south side of St John Street in 1859.

Although the chapel is shown on a detailed 1850 map of Rugby, St John Street is shown as building land. but not identified by name.

St Marks Avenue

Bilton, off Cawston Way

1914

SP 484735

St Mark’s, the parish church of Bilton.

A church in Bilton features in the Domesday Book. Pevsner in his “Buildings of Warwickshire”, states that the current building dates from the early 14th century with much 19th century restoration.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

St Matthews Street

Rugby, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

1842

SP 502750

St Matthew’s Church, Warwick Street

The street was built shortly after the church

The land upon which both the church and the street were built was previously owned by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827) and father of Matthew Bloxam (see Bloxam Place).

St Peters Road

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1905

SP 515752

St Peter’s Church, Clifton Road.

The road was made adjacent to the church.

St Peters Road runs from Clifton Road to Lower Hillmorton Road.

Stretton Court

Brownsover, off Hayes Close

1984

SP 516771

Joseph Stretton (1910-1968)

Joseph Stretton was mayor of Rugby (1960-61) and a Borough Councillor (1949-66).

His occupation was an insurance agent.

Studland Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

1939

SP 525741

Studland Bay, Dorset.

Studland Avenue was named by the developer, William Henry Adams (1873-1934) after Studland Bay which was a favourite holiday resort of his family.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Swan Street

Rugby

       

See Chapel Street

Sycamore Grove

Rugby, off Lancaster Road

1913

SP 504757

 Sycamore, Acer pseudoplatanus

The sycamore is a deciduous, broad-leafed tree native to central, eastern and southern Europe. It was probably introduced into the UK in the Middle Ages and is now a naturilised species.

See also Acacia, Maple & Poplar GrovesNamed so because the pavement was originally lined with Sycamore trees

Sywell Leys

Rugby, off Norton Leys

1977

SP 500729

Sywell is a village in the Borough of Wellingborough, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The origin of the name Sywell is Old English, meaning ‘Seven Springs’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Sywell has an aerodrome that caters for private flying, flight training and corporate flying. It opened in 1928 and was used in WW2 initially for basic pilot training and later as a repair base for Wellington bombers.

Tainter Close

Rugby, off Bell Road

2015

SP 508763

Charles Summer Tainter (1854-1940)

C S Tainter was an American scientific instrument maker, engineer and inventor.

C S Taintter was best known for his collaborations with Alexander Graham Bell and for his significant improvements to Thomas Edison’s phonograph which resulted in the first dictaphone.

Tanser Court

Dunchurch, off Done Cerce Close

1980

SP 482713

William Tanzer or Tanser or Tans’ur, (1706-1783)

William Tans’ur was baptised in Dunchurch on 6th November, 1706. He was a prominent composer of hymnal tunes particularly with regard to the setting to music of the Psalms.

Many of these tunes were named after local villages and included one named ‘Rugby’.

William Tans’ur introduced this spelling of his surname possibly to hide his background as the son of a farm labourer. By 1735 he had moved to Ewell in Surrey and later in the 1740s to St Neots, Cambridgeshire, where he remained until his death.

Tanser Court is a two-storey block of old-peoples flats. One of the first residents was Mr H H Tanser, a former chairman of the old Rugby Rural Council’s housing committee.

Teasel Close

Brownsover, off Sorrel Drive

1990

SP 527778

Common Teasel, Dipsacus fullorium

The common teasel is a tall prickly Eurasian plant with spiny purple flower heads. The seeds are an important winter food resource for some birds, notably the European goldfinch.

Teasel Close is one of group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

The name ‘teasel’ derives from an old english word, relating to the verb ‘to tease’ – The dried heads of the plant were once used in the textile industry to raise the nap on woolen cloth.

Temple Street

Rugby, Brown’s Farm Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 511747

Dr Frederick Temple DD (1821 – 1902)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1858 – 1869), Archbishop of Canterbury (1896 – 1902).

He was also Bishop of Taunton (1869 – 85) & Bishop of London (1885 – 96). He was the first president (1866 – 1902) of the Rugby Freehold Land Society which was responsible for the development of many residential estates in Rugby from 1866 to 1927. His memorial in Rugby is the Temple Speech Room in Hillmorton Road.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society (their Rugby Estate # 2) in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw (1788-1853).

Tennyson Avenue

Rugby, off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 492735

Alfred Tennyson (1809 – 92), 1st Baron Tennyson of Aldworth in the County of Sussex.

He was a poet. On the death of Wordsworth in 1850 he was appointed Poet Laureate until his own death in 1892, the longest that any laureate has held this position. Today’s laureates are appointed for a ten year period.

He was buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Among his works are The Charge of the Light Brigade, Maud, In Memoriam A H H, Locksley Hall and Idylls of the King. Edison recordings of him reading some of his poems are still available.

Many phrases from his poems have passed into the English language as everyday quotations, e.g. :-

·      ‘Theirs not to reason why, Theirs but to do and die,’

·      ‘In the Spring a young man’s fancy lightly turns to thoughts of love,’ and

·      ‘For men may come and men may go,

But I go on for ever.’

Thackeray Close

Rugby, Hillside, off Norton Leys

1965

SP 498731

William Makepeace Thackeray (1811 – 63)

He was an author who established a reputation by writing novels that satirised the social values of his day.

There is a memorial bust of him in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Although in his day he was ranked second only to Charles Dickens, he is today mainly remembered only for his novel Vanity Fair.

The Cross

Rugby

       

See Market Place

The Locks

 

Lower Hillmorton, off Brindley Road

see ‘Notes’ column.

 

SP 536742

 

The Hillmorton Locks, Oxford Canal.

 

This road leads to the three Hillmorton locks on the Oxford Canal.

 

Houses and other buildings on this road have been known as The Locks since the locks were built about 1773.

Thirlmere

 

Brownsover, off Copeland

 

1976

SP 511773

 

Thirlmere Reservoir, Cumbria

 

Thirlmere is a reservoir about three miles south of Keswick in Cumbria. Before construction of the reservoir in 1894 to provide water for Manchester, there was a smaller natural lake which had been known by several names.

 

Thirlmere is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The original dam raised the water level by twenty feet providing a capability for supplying 10 million gallons a day. Subsequently the dam was raised to provide a water level fifty feet above natural and allow a possible supply of 40 million gallons per day.

Thistle Way

Brownsover, off Sorrel Drive

1990

SP 517778

Thistle is the common name of a group of flowering plants characterised by leaves with sharp prickles

The thistle is the national flower of Scotland

Thistle Way is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Thruxton Place

Rugby, off Projects Drive

2012

SP 508767

Thruxton Motor Sport Centre, Thruxton, Hampshire.

Thruxton Motor Sport Centre hosts racing of motor cars, motor cycles and trucks. The site also includes a karting circuit.

Thruxton Place is one of the roads near and off Projects Drive that are named motor sport venues in the UK.

Thurnmill Road

Long Lawford, off Townsend Lane

1953

SP 481759

Thurnmill Spinney

Thurnmill Road leads to Thurnmill Spinney part of the land owned by the monks of Pipewell Abbey from the late 12th century.

The land included Thurn Mill, a water mill just east of of Long Lawford that is referred to in the Domesday Book. The mill at various times was driving corn and fulling mills. The mill was no longer there by the 19th century.

Tinkers Lane

Rugby

       

See Drury Lane

Tolsford Road

Houlton, off Station Avenue

2022

SP 549736

Tolsford Hill Radio Station, on the North Downs, near Folkestone, Kent.

Tolsford Hill Radio Station was built in 1957 to provide a link with France.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and many of its streets were named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Tom Brown Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Bath Street

1937

SP 509755

Tom Brown

Fictional hero of ‘Tom Brown’s Schooldays‘ by Thomas Hughes (1822 – 96)

This well known novel about Rugby School was written in 1857.

Torrance Road (unadopted)

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

1889

SP 495752

Dr David Torrance (1798 – 1874)

He had a medical practice in Rugby from about 1827 having before been a surgeon in the Royal Navy.

He was also the Medical Officer to the Rugby Union and a director of the Rugby Gas Company (1841 -55).

Tower Road

Rugby, off Naseby Road

1932

SP 511744

The former water tower in Barby Road.

It is said that Tower Road was so named because, if it was extended through Faraday Road it would bring one to the Barby Road water tower.

Tower Road was built on the site of Southfield Farm following its sale in 1930 by its owner, Mrs E D Miller, for residential development.

The water tower was demolished in 1966.

Townsend Lane

Long Lawford, off Rugby Road

1985

SP 481755

William Henry Worth Townsend, JP, (1842-1901)

W H R Townsend was the first chairman of the former Rugby Rural District Council from 1895 until his death in 1901. He also represented Kings Newnham on the Rugby Board of Guardians for 21 years, becoming its vice-chairman in 1893.

He farmed the Kings Newnham manor. As chairman of the Rugby Rural District Council, Mr Townsend became an ex-officio Justice of the Peace.

Subsequently he was placed permanentlyon the Commission of the Peace for the County of Warwick.

Troubridge Walk

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1973

SP 483746

Sir Thomas Troubridge, 1st Baronet (c1758-1807)

Rear Admiral of the Royal Navy (1804-7). He was 1st Sea Lord from 1801 to 1804.

He died at sea whilst travelling in HMS Blenheim to take up a new command.

His son, Sir Edward Thomas Troubridge (c1787-1852) the 2nd Baronet, was also an Admiral in the RN.

Trouton Drive

Houlton, off Braun Road

2022

SP 555734

Frederick Thomas Trouton (1863-1922). He received an OBE in 1918.

Trouton was an Irish physicist known for Trouton’s Rule and his experiments to detect the Earth’s motion through the lumeniferous aether. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in June 1897.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and many of its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Trussell Way

Cawston, off Cawston Grange Drive

2007

SP 471736

Margaret Trussell, née Boughton (bapt 1581)

Margaret married Thomas Trussell at Dunchurch in 1603.

Margaret’s father was Edward Boughton (d. 1589) who built Cawston Hall in 1585.

Trustees Close

Cawston, off Elborow Way

2018

SP 478728

The Trustees of the Elborow Foundation.

As a charitable foundation, Elborow School and Almshouses were managed by a board of trustees, one of which was always the Headmaster of Rugby School. The Board of Trustees ceased managing Elborow School when it came under the control of the LEA in 1902 following its separation from the Almshouse Foundation.

The names of the roads adjoining Elborow Way, Cawston, are all associated with the former Elborow Charity School, the ‘second oldest school in Rugby’.

Elborow School was closed in 1960, following a merger with Wood Street Girls School, to become Rugby St Andrew’s (CE) Junior and Infants School.

Turchil Road

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 475736

Turchil of Arden

Turchil was the son of Alwin, Sheriff of Warwickshire and was one of the few great Saxon landowners who continued to hold properties following the Norman invasion in 1066.

The Domesday Book shows that by 1086, Cawston, then known as Calvestone, was one of his estates, having previously in 1066 been held by Edwin (see Edwin Close).

Thorkell was one of the alternative spellings of his name.

Turner Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Joseph Mallord William Turner RA (1775 – 1851)

English painter.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London,

British Romantic landscape painter, water-colourist, and printmaker.

Turnstone Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2002

SP 513779

Turnstone, Arenaria interpres

The turnstone is a member of the large family of sandpipers. It is smallish winter visitor to Britain, preferring coastal shores which are stony, rocky or covered with seaweed and also constructions such as sea-walls, harbours and jetties.

The roads off Coton Park Road, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

The turnstone obtained its name from its habit of turning over stones etc whilst looking for insects, crustaceans and molluscs.

Twist Court

Rugby, off Expectations Drive

2016

SP 505763

“Oliver Twist”

Oliver Twist was the hero of the eponymously entitled novel written by Charles Dickens in 1839.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.