Roads L – N

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Ladysmock

Brownsover, off Cornflower Drive

1998

SP 516779

Lady’s Smock, Cardamine pretensis – often known as cuckoo flower.

Lady’s smock is a springtime perennial of damp grasses like wet meadows, ditches and river banks as well as roadside verges. Its distribution in the UK is widespead.

Ladysmock is one of a group of roads in Brownsover adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants that can be seen in the British Isles.

The lady’s smock is native to most of Europe and western Asia.

Landseer Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 537740

Sir Edwin Henry Landseer RA (1802 – 73)

English painter and sculptor

Well known for his paintings of animals—particularly horses, dogs and stags. Best known as the sculptor of the lions in Trafalgar Square, London.

Langdale Close

 

Brownsover, off Foxons Barn Road

 

1973

SP 514770

 

Great Langdale valley, Cumbria

 

Great Langdale valley, usually known simply as Langdale, stretches from Ambleside through Elterwater to the National Trust owned Dungeon Ghyll Hotel. It is a popular location for outdoor enthusiasts who are attracted by the many fells around the head of the valley.

 

Langdale Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

There is also an adjoining valley known as Little Langdale.

The highest fell in Langdale is Bow Fell that reaches a height of 2,960 feet (see also Bow Fell). On the northern side of Langdale are also a group of peaks known as the Langdale Pikes, several of which reach a height of over 2,200 feet.

Langton Road

 

Hillmorton, off Hillmorton Road

 

1920

SP 520741

 

John Allibone Langton (1842 – 1918)

 

John Allibone Langton was a landed gentleman whose properties included a farm of about 105 acres between Rugby and Hillmorton. Langton Road was laid out by the Rugby Land Society on part of the farm..

He made several donations to charity in his will, including £1000 each to St John’s Church, Hillmorton, and St Cross Hospital. In 1876 he changed his name by deed from John Allibone to John Allibone Langton. Langton was the maiden name of his deceased mother, Mary.

Larch Close

Bilton, off Mulberry Road

1989

SP 476746

European Larch, Larix decidula

Laurel is an aromatic evergreen, glabrous (smooth) leaves.It is native to the Mediterranean region and is used as bay leaf for seasoning in cooking. I in the UK it is commonly as the bay tree.

Laurel Drive is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can ce seen in the UK.

Larkspur

Brownsover, off Foxglove Close

1991

SP 520778

Larkspur is a common name for many flowers in the genus Delphinium.

Delphinium is a genus of about 300 species of annual and perennial flowering plants in the family Ranunculaceae native throughout the Northern Hemisphere and also on the high mountains of tropical Africa.

Larkspur is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

 

Lavender Close

Brownsover, off Gentian Way

1992

SP 521777

Lavender, Lavendula augustifolia

Lavendula (common name lavender) is a genus of 47 known species of flowering plants in the mint family, Lamiaceae. It is native to the Old World to south-west Asia. Commercially, the plant grown mainly for the production of lavender essential oil. English lavender (Lavendula augustifolia) yields an oil with sweet overtones.

Lavender Close is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lan, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Lawford Road

Rugby, off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

This is on the route of the ancient track that joined Rugby and Church Lawford.

It was part of a longer track that ran parallel with the River Avon from the Fosse Way to Watling Street.

Until the middle of the 19th century, this road in the parish of Rugby was often referred to as Lawford Street.

In the Domesday Book, Church Lawford is referred to as ‘Leileforde’. The meaning of this Old English name is probably ‘ford of  a man called Lealla (Leile)’.

This road attained prominence about 1870 with the establishment of the cement works and the subsequent development of New Bilton.

Lawford Street

Rugby, off Bilton Road

       

See Lawford Road.

Lawrence Road

 

Rugby, off Eastlands Road

 

1926

SP 516752

 

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 – 67)
see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567.

It is presumed that this road is another reminder of this famous Rugbeian. (see also Lawrence Sheriff Street.)

Lawrence Sheriff Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Warwick Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 502750

Lawrence Sheriff (c1515 – 67)

see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website.

He founded Rugby School in 1567 which now stands on Lawrence Sheriff Street.

In the 19th century this street was described as the “King’s Highway”; it later was known as School Street before being given its present name in the mid 19th century.

Lea Crescent

Newbold, off Parkfield Road

1951

SP 482764

Reginald Stephen Lea MA (1846 – 1925)

In 1904 he donated to the town its first purpose built, horse drawn ambulance. It was named the ‘Mary Wood’ ambulance after his childhood nurse.

He was headmaster (1876 – 86) of the Oakfield Preparatory School in Bilton Road & a lieutenant in the Rugby Volunteer Fire Brigade.

Leap View Close

Houlton, off Great Brook Ground

2023

SP 541747

Leap View Close was the name of a mediaeval farm field in Hillmorton

Land enclosures resulted in Leap View Close field having been incorporated in Normandy Farm by the time that the farm was sold to the Government for the Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets mostly named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Lee Drive

Houlton, off Pinetree Way

2019

SP 558736

Sir Albert George Lee OBE, MC, BSc, MIEE, (1879-1967).

He became a Knight Batchelor in 1937.

Sir Albert Lee helped with the design of the first transmitters at Rugby Radio Station and the development of long distancew radio-telephony. He later became the Engineer-in-Chief of the Post Office from 1932 to 1939.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Lennon Close

 

Hillmorton, off Crick Road

 

1975

 

SP 545734

 

Ernest Patrick Lennon (1889-1965)

 

He had been a member of the Borough Council from 1938 to 1961.

He was also the head of Lennon Bros. Ltd, a local firm of wholesale tobacco distributors.

Lestock Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1961

SP 490746

Richard Lestock, (1679 – 1746)

Admiral, RN (1746)

Richard Lestock was involved in the defeat of the RN at the Battle of Toulon (1744).

Lever Road

 

Hillmorton. off Coton Road

 

1963

 

SP 538741

 

Robert Lever MA (1849-1929)

 

Robert Lever was the vicar of St John the Baptist from 1889 to 1919.

He had been also at one time a member of Rugby RDC and Hillmorton Parish Council.

Lever Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

Levy Close

Rugby, off Rounds Gardens

1994

SP499755

Bryan Levy (1942-2007)

Bryan Levy was a Rugby Borough Councillor (1979-2000). He was Mayor of Rugby Borough for the year 1985-6. He was also a Warwickshire County Councillor (1989-2007)

Bryan Levy was admitted as an Honorary Freeman of the Borough in 2000.

Lilac Drive

Bilton, off Mulberry Lane

1988

SP 479745

Lilac, Syringa vulgaris

The lilac is a large deciduous shrub or multistemmed small tree, growing to 6-7 m (20-23 ft) high.

It is a very popular ornamental plant in gardens and parks because of its attractive, sweet-smelling and distinctively coloured flowers.

Lilac Drive is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Lime Tree Avenue

Bilton, off Alwyn Road

1950

SP 481735

Common Lime, Tilia x europaea

The common lime is a hybrid between the small-leaved lime Tilia cordata, and the large-leaved lim Tilia platyphylio.

Although the common lime does now occur naturally in the UK, so can be considered a UK native. it has been widely planted alongside roads and in parks.

This road was so named because it originally formed a drive way lined with lime trees to Cawston House. Part of the avenue has since been lined with private residences.

Lincoln Drive

Houlton, off Station Avenue

2023

SP 548736

Lincoln Cathedral, the Cathedral Church of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lincoln, Lincs.

Construction of the present-day Cathedral. or Minster. began in 1072, replacing the then Mother Church for Lincoln of St Mary, at Stow in Lindsey, Lincolnshire. At about this time Lincoln became the seat of the newly established Bishop of Lincoln. Prior to this time, the West Saxon diocese for the area was united with the bishopric of Dorchester, Dorset.

Lincoln Drive is one of a group of roads in the south of Houlton that were named after monasteries or minsters of the English church that were founded mainly during the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons in the seventh and eighth centuries.

Lindale

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

SP 516775

 

Lindale village, Cumbria

 

Lindale is traditionally known as Lindale in Cartmel. It is located in the civil parish of Allithwaite Upper in the South Lakeland district of the Lake District, and lies north of Grange-over-Sands on the north eastern edge of Morecambe Bay.

 

Lindale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Lindale’s most famous resident was John “Iron-Mad” Wilkinson (1728-1808), an ironmaster and industrialist. In the late 1770s he bought Castlehead Hill at Lindale where he built a mansion and improved 1,000 acres of nearly worthless moss land so that crops could be grown. He was buried at Castlehead where a cast iron obelisk still stands in his memory.

Linnell Road

Hillmorton, Abbott’s Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 528744

William Henry Linnell (1850 – 1928)

He was chairman of Rugby UDC (1907 – 09)

His occupation was a builder.

Little Church Street

Rugby Town centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

See ‘notes’ column

SP 504750

St Andrew’s Church

This street gave direct access to the parish church from the Hillmorton Road & Barby Road

The street features in a plan of 15th century Rugby, when it was known as ‘Old Town Street’.

Little Elborow Street

Rugby, off Corporation Street

1835

SP 501751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 – 1707)

Local benefactor & Freeman of City of London who founded in Rugby the Elborow charity school & almshouses.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827), who sold it for residential development.

Little Pennington Street

Rugby, off Plowman Street

1835 – 1845

SP 498751

This street is reputedly named after Mrs Rebecca Pennington.

In 1748 she sold to Rugby School the Old Mansion House and adjoining land that became the site of the present School House.

The Old Mansion House had previously been purchased about 1720 by Mrs Pennington’s father, Henry Plowman of Northampton, from the Burnaby family who had been Lords of the Manor of Rugby from 1594 to 1720.

Livingstone Avenue

Long Lawford, off Coventry Road

1938

SP 466757

James Livingston (1867-1935)

In addition to having been a member of the Rugby Rural District Council, James Livingston had been chairman of the Long Lawford parish council for many years. He became a farmer in Long Lawford when he moved south from Scotland in 1895.

The original 34 houses in this road were erected by the Land Settlement Association Ltd to provide homes for re-settled unemployed workers from depressed industrial areas of Britain.

The road name has always been spelt with a final ‘e’, contrary to the way that James Livingston’s name was spelt.

Liza Court

 

Brownsover, off Ennerdale

 

1987

SP 514775

 

River Liza, Cumbria

 

The Liza is a Lake District river that flows from its source on Great Gable through Ennerdale valley into Ennerdale Water.

Liza Court is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Lodge Road

 

Rugby, off Manor Road

 

1903

 

SP 505757

 

The Lodge

The Lodge was a house situated in what is now Caldecott Park and was the home of the last Lord of the Manor of Rugby, Thomas Caldecott (1798-1875). It had been built about 1720 by the Boughton family, when the former Manor House in Lawrence Sheriff Street was sold to Henry Plowman of Northampton (see also Plowman Street).

Lodge Road was laid out by The Rugby Land Society on the part of the Lodge Estate that they purchased from the Miss Harris sisters, two grand-daughters of Thomas Caldecott by his daughter, Ellen Harris (1832-62).

Longrood Road

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1934

SP 487733

Longrood House

Longrood was a large house that was originally built in a rural setting. It adjoined Longrood Farm.

The entrance to Longrood House was off Bawnmore Road between the present junctions with Beswick Gardens and Longrood Road.

Loverock Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott’s Farm Estate, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1956

SP 524745

Lewis Loverock (1858 – 1932)

He was a chairman of the Rugby UDC (1912 – 14 & 1921 – 23). He was also an Alderman of the Warwickshire County Council (1923 – 1932). At his death he was the Deputy Charter Mayor of Rugby and had been offered the position of first Mayor of Rugby.

His occupation was a draper. At his death he was chairman of Rugby Gas Company and was also a governor of Lawrence Sheriff School.

His father was George Loverock (1832 – 98), also a draper and a member of the UDC.

Lower Hillmorton Road

Rugby, off Clifton Road

 

SP 509751

It was one of two historic routes between Rugby and the village of Hillmorton

The road led to the low lying Domesday village of Moreton.

In 1930, A E Treen, a prominent local historian, described the Lower Road as “a… brdleway, the most primitive now existing in the immediate vicinity of our town.”

In medieval times Moreton became known as Hillmorton when it was merged with the hamlet or village of Hulle that had grown up on the higher land to the south of Moreton.

(see also Hillmorton Road.)

Luke Jeayes Close

Cawston, off Trustees Close

2020

SP 474732

Luke Jeayes (1810-81)

Luke Jeayes was Master of Elborow School (1844-52). He oversaw many improvements to the school’s facilities. Following his retirement from the School, he went on to to be prominent in the local government and commercial lives of the town, most notably as a coal merchant, the Secretary of the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society and the Parish Clerk.

The names of the roads adjoining Elborow Way, Cawston, are all associated with the Elborow Charity School, the ‘second oldest school in Rugby’.

Lydden Close

Rugby, off Oulton Road

2009

SP 509768

Lydden Hill Race Circuit, Wooton, Kent.

This small circuit is mainly used for rallycross, drift, saloon and sports car racing, as well as motor cycle racing.

Lydden Close is one of the roads near to and off Projects Drive that are named after motor sport venues in the UK.

Lytham Road

 

Bilton, off Bilton Road

 

1938

SP 489744

 

Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club, Lytham St Annes, Lancashire.

 

This road was named after one of their favourite golf courses by the builder, David Mitchell and his associates.

(see also St Annes Road)

The Royal Lytham & St Annes Golf Club was founded in 1886 and the present course constructed in 1897. It is one of the world’s premier links courses, having hosted many major tournaments including eleven open championships.

Macaulay Road

Rugby, off Shakespeare Gardens

1959

SP 494734

Thomas Babington Macaulay, (1800 – 59), Baron Macaulay of Rothley, Leicestershire.

See also ‘Notes’ section.

He was a historian, essayist and poet. He was also a Whig politician who became a Member of Parliament for most of 1830 – 1856. During that time he held office as Secretary of War (1839 – 41) and Paymaster-General (1846 – 48).

Possibly best known for his “History of England from the accession of James II”. The fifth and last volume, taking it to the death of William III in 1702, was completed and published posthumously by his sister.

He is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Alternatively Macaulay Road was named after Dame (Emilie) Rose Macaulay DBE (1881 – 1958), novelist. She was born in Rugby, the second of the seven children of George Campbell Macaulay (1852–1915), assistant master at Rugby School. Among her Macaulay antecedents was Thomas B. Macaulay, a first cousin of her paternal grandfather. Her family moved from Rugby in 1887.

She was made a DBE in 1958.

Macbeth Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

 

1966

SP 492726

 

Macbeth

 

Macbeth is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) in about 1606. In it Macbeth murders Duncan the King of Scotland and takes the throne himself.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

 

Madden Place

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1990s

SP 483749

Sir Charles Edward Madden, 1st Baronet, (1862 – 1935)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1924 – 30)

His son was also an admiral in the RN.

Madigan Close

Houlton, off Maine Street

2018

SP 552738

Madigan Street, Houlton, Maine, USA.

The first trans-Atlantic telephony signals from Rugby Radio Station were received in the USA at Houlton, Maine.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Magnet Lane

Bilton, off Main Street

1921

SP 482736

‘The Magnet’ coffee room.

The Magnet coffee room had been set up in Bilton in 1875 by the Reverend Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836 – 1909), a noted member of the temperance movement, in an attempt to ‘draw’ working men away from the public houses of the village.

The Reverend Richard Orme Assheton was the Rector of St Mark’s Church, Bilton, (1862 – 95).

Magnolia Avenue

Brownsover, off Lower Lodge Avenue

2015

SP 509781

The magnolia is a large genus of flowering trees.

Various species of the magnolia have been introduced into the UK as ornamental trees or shrubs.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Maidenhair Drive

Brownsover, off Larkspur

1991

SP 520778

Maidenhair Fern, Adiantum

Adiantum is a genus of about 250 species of ferns that are found around the weorld. They are popular as houseplants.

Maidenhair Drive is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Maine Street

Houlton, off Houlton Way

2018

SP 552738

Maine State, USA

The first trans-Atlantic telephony signals from Rugby Radio were received in the USA at Houlton, Maine.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Mallow Way

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1997

SP 516777

Common Mallow, Malva sylvestris

Common mallow is part of a large family of Malvaceae plants. It can be found throughout the UK but is especially common in Wales and southern England. It grows on roadside verges, along footpaths, and on waste ground.

Mallow Way is one of a group of roads in Brownsover adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way. They are named after wild plants that can be seen in the British Isles.

Common mallow is native to Europe and Asia.

Manning Walk

Rugby, within Central Shopping Centre

N/A

SP 503752

William Arthur Manning (1896-1990)

Mr Manning was Mayor of Rugby (1954-55) and was a member of Rugby Borough Council (1945-74). He was also on Warwickshire County Council (1955-74).

Mr Manning worked in engineering (1910-28) and then was employed by the Rugby Co-operative Society.

As Manning Walk is within the Central Shopping Centre, it has no residents.

Manor Road

 

Rugby, off Park Road

 

1903

 

SP 504758

 

Thomas Caldecott 1798-1875)

 

Manor Road was so named because it was built on the former Lodge Estate, the home of Thomas Caldecott, the last Lord of the Manor of Rugby (1826-1875).

 

Manor Road was laid out by The Rugby Land Society on the part of the Lodge Estate that they purchased from the Miss Harris sisters, two grand-daughters of Thomas Caldecott by his daughter, Mrs Ellen Harris (1832-62).

Maple Grove

Rugby, off Lancaster Road

c 1915

SP 503758

The maple tree (Genus: Acer)

It is said to have been named so because the pavement was originally lined with Maple trees

See also Acacia, Poplar & Sycamore Groves.

Marconi Close

Houlton. off Shaughnessy Way

2018

SP 555738

Marconi Wireless Telegraph Co.

This company was set up by Guglielmo Marconi (1874-1937). It was originally contracted to produce a chain of state-owned wireless stations throughout the British Empire. However this work was taken over by the Post Office so as to keep the service under Government control.

Martconi was an experimenter that turned wireless into a practical proposition.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associted with it and the further development of radio.

Market Place

Rugby Town centre

See ‘notes’ column

SP 503752

Street market

This is at the historic centre of the town. Street markets were held in Market Place until April 1953, when they were moved to Church Street.

Prior to the end of the 17th cen. a market cross stood near to the site of the present clock tower and the site was known as The Cross.

Market Street

Rugby, Between Railway Terrace and Bath Street.

c 1903

SP 508755

Rugby Cattle Market

Believed to be so named because of its proximity to the then site of the cattle market.  (See also the entry for Sheep Street).

The cattle market was moved to a site near to the railway station when the lease on Reynolds Field expired in 1878. The market remained there until May 2008 when it was closed and the business moved to Stoneleigh Park near Leamington.

Matlock Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1975

SP 511770

 

Matlock, Derbyshire.

 

Matlock is the county town of Derbyshire. It is nine miles south west of Chesterfield.

Matlock is just outside the south eastern boundary of the Peak District National Park. The civil parish of Matlock Town had a population of 9,543 in the 2011 Census.

Maxwell Road

Houlton, off Dollman Road

2017

SP 554735

James Clerk Maxwell (1831-79)

James Maxwell was involved in the development of the theory and practice of Electromagnetism.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Mayfield Grove

Rugby, off Marlborough Road

       

See Garyth Williams Close

McKinnell Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott’s Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1965

SP 534745

James Jesse McKinnell CBE (1869 – 1950)

JP for Warwickshire; Chairman of Rugby UDC (1914 – 19); County Councillor (1917 – 21); Mayor of Rugby (1932 – 34)

He was born In Rugby and had a grocery shop at 27 Sheep Street, Rugby, until his retirement about 1927.

Meadowsweet

Brownsover, off Cornflower Drive

1998

SP 515772

Meadowsweet, Filipendula ulmaria

Meadowsweet is a perennial herb, a member of the Rosaceae (rose) family. It is common throughout the British Isles in damp habitats.

Meadowsweet is one of a group of roads in Brownsover adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants that can be seen in the British Isles.

Mellor Road

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

1961

SP 538738

James Henry Mellor (1863-1951)

Mr Mellor was Mayor of Rugby (1940-42), having been continuously from 1920 a member of the former Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, Rugby Borough Council. He was also a JP from 1933 and for a short time a member of Warwickshire County Council.

Mr Mellor was born in Glossop, Derbyshire. In Rugby he was employed at Messrs Willan and Robinson for eight years and later he became chief clerk of the lamp sales department of the BTH.

He was a prominent Methodist, and had been a preacher for 65 years.

Merlin Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2001

SP 513778

Merlin, Falco columbarius

The merlin is a smallish falcon that breeds throughout Britain where there is open country, particularly moorland. It also winters in Britain, generally moving from its summer range to lower coastal areas.

The roads off Cpton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Merttens Drive

Rugby, off Bilton Road

1964

SP 499749

Frederick Merttens (1849-1935)

He was a philanthropist and active promoter of Adult Education. He presented the Merttens’ Playing Field in Bilton Road to Warwickshire County Council for the use of local children. When the drive leading to the playing field was later made up by the County Council after the building of Brooke School, it was named after Mr Merttens.

Frederick Merttens was born in Germany. He established in Manchester a successful export business in textiles. Having earlier retired from business through ill-health, he came to Rugby in 1905. He took an active part in the affairs of the town, including being a Justice of the Peace for Warwickshire, and a member of the Board of Management of St Cross Hospital.

Merynton Close

Newbold, off Parkfield Road

2021

SP 490770

John de Merynton

John de Merynton was a tenant farmer of Newbold Grange in the fourteenth century.

In 1333, John de Merynton forcibly enclosed land (‘la grene’) in front of the grange for his own use that previously other tenants, great and small, had grazing rights.

Mica Close

Rugby, off Hopps Lodge Close.

2006

SP 515750

Micas are a group of silicate minerals.

Mica is widely used in industry to form ceramics with good electrical and heat resistance. An important use of Mica ceramic is as an insulator in sparking plugs for the motor and aircraft industries.

Mica Close is one of three residential roads that were erected on the former site of the Lodge Plugs factory in St Peters Road when Morgan Matroc Ltd moved production to a new factory in Central Park Drive, Brownsover.

Millbeck

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

 

SP 517774

 

Millbeck, Cumbria

 

Millbeck, by the slopes of Skiddaw, is a small hamlet about 3 miles north of Keswick, between Bassenthwaite Lake and Derwent Water

Millbeck is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

 

Millers Dale Close

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1975

SP 551773

 

Millers Dale, Derbyshire

 

Millers Dale is a valley in Derbyshire’s River Wye. It is a popular beauty spot about 1½ miles south of the town of Tideswell.

 

Millers Dale Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that has been named after places or features in the Peak District of Derbyshire.

Features of Millers Dale are the former Midland Railway viaducts and tunnels which now form part of the Monsal Trail for walkers and cyclists.

Millfields Avenue

Hillmorton, off Kingsley Avenue

1931

SP 520740

Hillmorton Windmill

The name Millfields was derived by the developer, William Henry Adams, from the windmill that formerly stood on the nearby mound in the Hillmorton Recreation Ground.

This information was provided by Cedric Thomas Adams, the son of the developer, in his letter to the Rugby Advertiser dated 11 August 1983.

Mill Road

Rugby, off Murray Road

 

SP 512760

It is the name given to the historic lane leading to Brownsover watermill from Rugby town.

 

Mill Road led to the water mill at Brownsover. It originally ran north from Craven Road to the mill and was known until about 1901 as Brownsover Mill Road.

When a through connection with Murray Road was established in about 1905, the part of Brownsover Mill Road south of the station was renamed as Murray Road.

Mill Street

Rugby

       

See North Street

Milnerton Close

Houlton, off Maxwell Road

2017

SP 555736

Milnerton, Cape Town, South Africa

Milnerton was the receiving station in South Africa for the Short Wave Telephone service from Rugby Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Moat Street

Rugby

       

See Regent Place

Monks Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 475735

The monks of Pipewell Abbey.

The monks of Pipewell, a Cistercian abbey near Kettering in Northamptonshire possessed several granges in the vicinity of Dunchurch, with Cawston being the most valuable

Pipewell Abbey was established in 1143 by William Butevilain.

Montague Road

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Juliet Drive

1968

SP 485725

 

The Montague family of Verona, Italy.

 

Romeo and Juliet” is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) about 1595. In it Romeo, a Montague, is one of the two lovers whose death reconciles the Capulets with their sworn enemies the Montagues. (see also Capulet Close.)

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

 

Montgomery Drive

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1949

SP 481740

Bernard Law Montgomery, 1st Viscount Montgomery of Alamein, KGGCBDSOPC (1887 – 1976)

He served in the British Army from 1908 to 1958. He followed his success in defeating Rommel’s Panzer Corps in North Africa by being one of the outstanding Allied commanders in World War II and was appointed Field Marshal in 1944.

He commenced his career with the Ist Battalion of the Royal Warwickshire Regiment with whom he served in France in the WW1 until he was injured. Among his other appointments between the world wars was as Company Commander of the Regiment.

Following WWII, his commands included being Chief of the Imperial General Staff (1946 – 1948) and Deputy Supreme Commander, Europe, of NATO (1951–58).

Montrose Road

Rugby, Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is  uncertain.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Montrose’ probably also has a family connection.

It has been speculated that ‘Montrose’ is a combination of the ‘Mont’ in Belmont Road and the ‘Rose’ in Rosewood Avenue (qv).

Morson Crescent

Hillmorton, Abbott’s Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent

1956

SP 524748

Arthur Morson MBE (1859 – 1931)

He was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1905 – 07); he later became clerk to the UDC (1907 – 27).

 In 1918he was one of the first members of the newly founded Order of the British Empire.

Mosedale

 

Brownsover, off Junewood Close

 

1988

 

SP 520773

 

Mosedale, Cumbria

 

Mosedale is a hamlet in the north of the Lake District National Park. It is on the River Caldew, about one mile north of Mungrisdale.

 

Mosedale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Mosedale, together with seven other hamlets, is part of the civil parish of Mungrisdale which in the 2001 Census had a poulation of 284.

Moss Close

Bilton, off Bracken Drive

1984

SP 493741

Mosses belong to a group of plants called bryophytes. Comprising the mosses, liverworts and hornworts, there are over 1,000 species of bryophyte in Britain and Ireland, which is around 58% of the species found in the whole of Europe.

Mosses are small, flowerless plants which typically form dense, green clumps, often in damp or shady locations. They include a broad and diverse range of types, with over 20,000 different varieties.

On the Woodlands estate, Moss Close is one of a small group of roads that have been nmed after plants that grow on heathlands, moors and bogs in the UK.

Moultrie Road

Rugby Town Centre, off Clifton Road

c1901

SP 507751

Rev John Moultrie (1799 – 1874)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1825 – 1874). Also a poet & hymn writer.

He died of smallpox that he caught whilst ministering to patients at the isolation hospital in Barby Road.

Moyeady Avenue

 

Hillmorton, Paddox Estate, off Dunsmore Avenue

c 1915

 

SP 524738

 

Moyeady, Co. Wexford, Ireland

 

John Patrick Lennon, a Rugby tobacconist and the landlord of The Globe Inn, owned part of the Paddox land on which Moyeady Avenue was built. He named the Avenue after Moyeady as his father was born there.

 

Moyeady is a townland, the smallest administrative division of land in Ireland, in the parish of Marshalstown.

The individual building plots in Moyeady Avenue were sold at an auction of the Paddox estate in 1912.

Muirhead Rise

Houlton, off Maine Street

2019

SP 553739

Dr Alexander Muirhead BSc, DSc, FRS, MIEE (1848-1920)

Dr Muirhead was an electrical engineer specialising in wireless telegraphy.

Companies that he had formed provided equipment that was used at the Rugby Radio Station.

The Residial development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

 

Mulberry Road

Bilton, off Bilton Lane

1987

SP 476745

The Mulberry tree. There are two formsof the Mulberry found in the UK; the black mulberry, Morus nigra, and the white mulberry, Morus alba. Neither are none-native.

The mulberry tree is a deciduous flowering plant in the family Moraceae that grows wild or is cultivated in many temperate regions of the world. The black mulberry was probably introduced into Britain about 1500 for its edible fruit. The white mulberry was introduced into Britain in the 16th century because it is the favourite food of the silkworm.

Mulberry Road is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Murray Road

Rugby Town Centre, off Clifton Road

1898

SP 508751

John Murray MA (1828 – 1899)

Rector of St Andrews, Rugby (1875 – 1898)

He sold about 18 acres of glebe land over which Murray Road now passes.

When first built, Murray Road only extended north from Clifton Road to Wells Street. At that time the present section of road between Craven Road and the railway was known as Brownsover Mill Road. (see also Mill Road). In about 1905, Murray Road was extended to Craven Road to make a throughway to the railway. The section of Mill Road south of the railway  was also renamed as Murray Road

Murrayian Close

Rugby, off Murray Road

1983

SP 508752

St Andrew’s Murray School (1882 – 1965)

This close was built on the site of the former school.

The close was named at the request of the Old Murrayian Association, the former pupils of Murray School.

Myers Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Packwood Road

1961

SP 539738

Richard Henry Myers JP (1866 – 1943)

Mayor of Rugby (1938 – 40). He was elected to the Rugby UDC in 1929, and was one of the first aldermen (1932-1943) of the new Rugby Borough Council.

He was also a member of the County Council (1931-43)

He was headmaster of St Matthew’s Boys School (1891-1926).

He was a Justice of the Peace (1928-43).

He held many positions, too many to list here, in local government and voluntary organisations.

Naseby Road

Rugby, off Cromwell Road

1932

SP 511744

William Naseby (1816 – 1907)

He lived in Hillmorton Road near the present entrance to Cromwell Road. His cottage was known as Naseby House. Following his death his market garden land was later known as Southfields Farm.

Naseby Road was part of the Southfields residential estate which was developed when Southfields Farm was sold by its owner, Mrs E D Miller, following the death of her husband and its last occupant, Captain Harry Rich in 1930.

Nayler Close

Rugby, off Kinman Way

2000

SP 511768

Charles Henry Naylor (1870-1943)

He was head of Turbine Sales at the BTH from 1911 until his death in 1943. During his time there he wrote many papers on turbine efficiencies.

Nayler Close was built on the former GEC/BTH factory site, it having been sold off for development in about 1990.

It should be noted that the road should have been spelt as Naylor Close, having been named after Mr Naylor.

Near Birtch Road

Houlton, off Great Brook Ground

2021

SP 541747

Near Birch Road was named after Near Birch Ground, a mediaeval farm field.

Land enclossures resulted in Near Birch Ground having been incorporated in Normandy Farm  by the time that the farm was sold to the Government for the radio station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets mostly named after people, events and  equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Nelson Way

Bilton, off Lawford Lane

1949

SP 481740

George Horatio Nelson, 1st Baron Nelson of Stafford (1887 – 1962)

Chairman of English Electric (1930 – 1962). He was knighted in 1943, created a baronet in 1955 and received his peerage in 1960.

243 homes in Nelson Way and the adjoining roads were built after WW2 by English Electric for key employees. When they were first built, the area was known as the Kingsway Estate after the English Electric head office in London, Kingsway House.

When the adjoining land was developed for housing, the new roads were all named after RN Admirals, and the area, including Nelson Way, became known as the Admirals Estate.

Newbold Road

Rugby Town centre, off Corporation Street

see Notes column

SP 501755

Newbold-on-Avon village.

This was the route of the historic road to Newbold-on-Avon, a continuation of North Street.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 – 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it had been given its present name.

New Street

Rugby

       

See Eastfield Place

Nickleby Close

Rugby, off Technology Drive

2016

SP 505764

Nicholas Nickleby.”

This novel was writtern by Charles Dickens as a monthly serial from March 1838.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Nightingale Gardens

Brownsover, off Cotron Park Drive

2002

SP 514781

Nightingale, Luscinia megarhynchos

The nightingale is a thrush of the family Turdidae. It is a summer visitor to southern England and winters in sub-tropical Africa.

The roads of Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds. The nightingale is noted for its song in late evening.

Noble Drive

Cawston, off Clement Way

2002

SP 473735

The Peerage of England

Members of the peerage had from time to time owned Cawston.

Among the nobility who possessed Cawston was Turchil, the Saxon Earl of Warwick, who is listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as the owner. Another prominent peer to own the Cawston Estate  was John, second Duke of Montagu, who purchased it about 1744.

Norman Road

 

Newbold, off Yates Avenue

 

1952

SP 497767

 

Thomas Goodman Norman (1846-1927)

 

He was a member of the Rugby Rural District Council for 44 years and was chairman of the Rugby Rural District Council (1901-07).

In 1911 he was described as a grazier and was living in Newbold on Avon.

Apparently he did not believe in “new-fangled notions” and did not alter his clocks when daylight was introduced.

Normandy View

Houlton, off Station Avenue

2021

SP 749738

Normandy Viewwas the name of a mediaeval farm field in Hillmorton.

Land enclosures resulted in Normandy View farm field having been incorporated in Normandy Farm by the time that the farm was sold to the Government for the radio station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton  and its streets mostly named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Northcote Road

 

Rugby, off Lawford Road

 

1913

SP 497751

 

Northcote House

 

The Rugby Land Society planned and laid out Northcote Road as part of their small Lawford Road estate.

 

As Northcote House was a large residence on the east side of Newbold Road, some distance away from Northcote Road, it is unclear why The Rugby Land Society used this name.

North Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

 

An ancient road that led to the north of the town centre.

It was part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 – 1878). In the 1841 census it was known as Mill Street, but by the end of that decade it was given its present name.

Norton Leys

Rugby, off Goldsmith Avenue

1964

SP 497730

The village of Norton, about two miles east of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The Old English meaning of the name, Norton, was ‘north farmstead’.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Near to Norton, on Watling Street, is the Roman settlement of Bannaventa.