Roads E – G

 

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Eastfield Place

Rugby Town Centre, off Little Church Street

Prior to 1841

SP 504751

Eastfield House

This street was known as New Street until 1935 when it was renamed to avoid confusion with the longer New Street in New Bilton.

‘Eastfield’ appears in the 1871 census. Eastfield House became a preparatory school attached to the Arnold High School until its present use as the Masonic Hall.

The name New Street appears in the 1841 census returns for Rugby.

Eastlands Place

Rugby, off Eastlands Road

1927

SP 517751

Eastlands Farm

The road was built on part of the site of the former farm.

It has not been established how the farm obtained its name.

It is probable that it was because the farm on land at the eastern edge of Rugby Parish.

Eastlands Road

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1927

SP 516753

Eastlands Farm

The road was built on part of the former farm.

It has not been established how the farm obtained its name.

It is probable that it was so named because the farm was on land at the eastern edge of Rugby Parish.

East Leyes

Rugby

       

See Pinders Lane

East Union Street

Rugby Town centre, off Dunchurch Road

A map of 1849 names this road as Union Street.

SP 502748

The origin of this street name is not known.

The name of this street was recorded as East Union Street in the 1851 census return for Rugby.

It provided a connecting link between the southern end of Union Street and Dunchurch Road. It initially may have been part of Union Street.

Ecton Leys

Rugby, off Fawsley Leys

1982

SP 503732

Ecton, a village east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, used for grazing animals.

The village was known as Echentone in the Domesday Book, meaning “farmstead of a man called Ecca”.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Eden Road

Abbott’s Farm Estate, Hillmorton, off Vere Road

1957

SP 526743

Thomas Bainbridge Eden (1856 – 1944)

T B Eden was chairman of the Rugby UDC (1900 – 03)

He was the headmaster of Hillbrow Preparatory School (1889 – 1908) in Barby Road. He had previously been teaching at Orwell House Preparatory School, Clifton on Dunsmore.

Edison Drive

Rugby, off Technology Drive

2014

SP 510762

Thomas Alva Edison (1847-1937)

Thomas Edison was a prominent American inventor and businessman.

Thomas Edison made a large number of inventions including the automatic telegraph, a carbon, telephone transmitter, an improved electric light bulb, a movie camera and viewer, and an alkaline storage battery.

Edwin Close

Cawston off Calvestone Road

2001

SP 475735

Edwin

The Domesday Book says that a man named ‘Edwin’ held Calvestone (Cawston) prior to 1066.

Edwin was a common name at this time and it is difficult to determine whether any of the other “Edwins” mentioned in the Warwickshire section of the Domesday Book was the holder of Cawston.

Edyvean Close

 

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

 

1983

SP 491728

 

Norman Edyvean-Walker (1894-1974)

 

Edyvean Close was built on land off Dunchurch Road on which Norman Edyvean-Walker’s house and garden were situated. The original field that Norman Edyvean-Walker’s home was built upon was known as Spinney Close.

 

Until his retirement, Norman Edyvean-Walker was a solicitor in the family firm from 1913.He was also a non-executive director of Rugby Portland Cement Company. He became a deputy lieutenant of Warwickshire in 1952. He was made an honorary freeman of Rugby in 1969 in recognition of his many interests in the Borough which included the British Legion and St Cross Hospital.

Elborow Street

Rugby, off Corporation Street

1835

SP 500751

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645 – 1707)

see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website.

Local benefactor & freeman of London who founded the Elborow charity school & almshouses in Rugby.

The site of this street was owned in the 17th cen. by Richard Elborowe and in the early 19th cen. by Dr R R Bloxam (1765-1840), an assistant master at Rugby School (1791-1827), who sold it for residential development.

Elborow Way

Cawston, off Coventry Road

2018

SP 474733

Richard Elborowe jun (c1645-1707); see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website.

Local benefactor and freeman of London, who founded in 1707 the Elborow charity school and almshouses in Rugby.

The names of the roads adjoining Elborow Way, Cawston, are all associated with the former Elborow Chariyu School, the ‘second oldest school in Rugby’.

Elborow Schoolwas closed in 1960, following a merger with Wood Street Girls School, which became Rugby St Andrews (CE) Junior and Infants School.

Elder Avenue

Brownsover, off Aspen Road

2014

SP 510780

Elder, Sambucus nigra

The Elder is a small deciduous tree native to the UK and much of Europe.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Elder Close

Bilton, Mulberry Road

1987

SP 478745

Elder, Sambucus nigra

The Elder is a small deciduous tree native to the UK and much of Europe.

Elder Close is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Elsee Road

Rugby Town Centre, off Moultrie Road

1901

SP 507750

Charles Elsee MA (1830 – 1912)

Assistant Master, Rugby School (1860 – 1901); Chairman of Rugby UDC (1895 – 1900); County Councillor (1888 – 1910); County Alderman (1910 – 12).

Charles Elsee was a member of the Board of Management of the Hospital of St Cross from 1887, being its Chairman from 1893 to his death in 1912; he was also a Governor of the Lawrence Sheriff School. Elsee Road was built on Reynolds Field, part of the St Andrew’s glebe lands.

Elter Close

 

Brownsover, off Bow Fell

 

1974

SP 517771

 

Elter Water, Cumbria

 

Elter Water is a small lake about half a mile south east of the village of Elterwater. The river Brathay flows in an easterly direction from Elter Water to join Windermere near Ambleside.

Elter Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Elter Water has a maximum length of 1,030 yards and a maximum width of 350 yards. Its maximum depth is only 20 feet.

Ernest Harvey Close

Cawston, off Richard Walker Way

2018

SP 474732

Ernest Arthur Harvey (b 1887)

Ernest Harvey was Headmaster of Elborow Boy’s School (1925-1941).Bilkington School (1941-6) and Murray School. 1946-7).

The names of the roads adjoining Elborow Way, Cawston, are all associated with the Elborow Charity School, the ‘second oldest school in Rugby’.

Ennerdale

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1975

SP 513773

 

Ennerdale Water, Cumbria

 

Ennerdale Water is the most westerly lake in the National Park and at about 2½ miles long, one of the smallest in the area. It is about eight miles to the east of Whitehaven and about a mile to the east of the small village of Ennerdale Bridge.

Ennerdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Ennerdale is fed by the river Liza, and flows out along the River Ehen to the sea near Sellafield.

 

Eskdale

 

Brownsover, off Borrowdale

 

1976

SP 512773

 

Eskdale, Cumbria

 

Eskdale is a glacial valley and civil parish in the western Lake District. The River Esk rises on Bow Fell mountain and runs through the valley to its estuary at Ravenglass

 

Eskdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The Ravenglass and Eskdale Railway runs through the valley from Ravenglass to its eastern terminus at Dalegarth near Boot.

At the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was 304.

Evans Road

Admirals Estate, Bilton, off Frobisher Road

1963

SP 482746

Edward Radcliffe Russell Garth Evans, 1st Baron Mountevans KCB DSO (1881 – 1957)

Admiral RN (1936 – 41)

He was in command of the Terra Nova the support ship that accompanied Scott’s ill fated expedition of 1910-13 to the South Pole. He was in command of the destroyer HMS Broke in 1917 when it and the destroyer HMS Swift defeated 6 German destroyers in the Dover Straight. He later became Commander in Chief, The Nore, one of the Navy’s major home commands  (1935 – 39)

Everest Road

Bilton, off Overslade Lane

 

1954

SP 493737

Mount Everest, the world’s highest mountain at 29,035 feet.

 

Thus road was named to commemorate the first ascent of Mount Everest by Sir Edmund Hillary in June 1953. (see also Hillary Road.)

It is one of the many Himalayan high peaks in Nepal.

 

Evreux Way

Rugby Town Centre, off North Street

1966

SP 503754

Evreux, Normandy,  France

The Borough Council chose this name for the section of Newbold Road in front of the Town Hall that had become separated by a roundabout from the remainder during the construction of Corporation Street.

Rugby was twinned with Evreux in 1959.

Expectations Drive

Rugby, off Barnaby Road

2015

SP 508764

Great Expectations”

Great Expectations is a novel written by Charles Dickens in 1861.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Eydon Close

 

Brownsover, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520768

 

Eydon, Northamptonshire

 

Eydon is a village and civil parish about 8 miles northeast of Banbury.

 

Eydon Close is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after a village in or near south Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census its population was 422.

Falstaff Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Montague Road

 

1966

SP 489724

 

Sir John Falstaff

 

He is a fictional character who appears on stage in three of Shakespeare’s plays, Henry IV Parts 1 and 2, and also in the Merry Wives of Windsor.

 

He is also referred to, without him making a stage appearance, in Henry V.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

Faraday Road

 

Rugby, off Pytchley Road

 

1932

SP 511741

 

Michael Faraday FRS (1791-1867)

 

Michael Faraday was an English chemist and physicist whose discoveries made significant contributions to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1824.

The SI unit of capacitance, the farad, was named after him.

A plaque in his memory is in Westminster Abbey near to Isaac Newton’s tomb. He is interred in Highgate Cemetery.

 

Faraday Way

Rugby, off Academy Drive

1997

SP 515749

Michael Faraday FRS (1791-1867)

Michael Faraday was an English chemist and physicist whose discoveries made significant contributions to the study of electromagnetism and electrochemistry. He was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society in 1824.

The SI unit of capacitance, the farad, was named after him.

Aplaque in his memory is in Westminster Abbey near to Isaac Newton’s tomb. He is interred in Highgate Cemetery.

Faulkner Road

Houlton, off Dollman Road

2017

SP 553736

Harry Faulkner CMG, BSc (Eng), MIEE, (b 1893). He became the first Engineer-in-Charge of Rugby Radio Station (1926-29).

Harry Faulkner was involved in the design of the Long Wave GBR valvetransmitter and spoke during the first telephone conversation across the Atlantic. He became the Deputy Engineer-in-Chief of the Post Office in 1947.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Fawsley Leys

Rugby, off Long Furlong

1965

SP 500735

Fawsley, a ‘lost’ village near to Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Featherbed Lane

Bilton

       

See Bawnmore Road and Overslade Lane

Fenwick Drive

off High Street, Hillmorton

1939

SP 534736

George Anthony Fenwick, (1841 – 1912)

Fenwick Drive was built on site of his house, The Croft, High Street, Hillmorton.

George Anthony Fenwick was a retired banker from Newcastle upon Tyne where he was born.

Fern Close

Brownsover, off Cornflower Drive

1998

SP 516778

Bracken, Pteridium aquillinum

Ferns are members of a large group of vascular plants that reproduce via spores and have no seeds or flowers. Bracken is the most common fern in the UK. It can be found on hillsides, moorland, heathland and woodland.

Fern Close is one of a group of roads in Brownsover that adjoin the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, and are named after wild plants that can be seen in the British Isles.

In addition to bracken, there are many species of fern in the UK, including horsetail.

Ferndown Road (including Ferndown Terrace)

 

Bilton, Overslade Estate, off Hudson Road

 

1949

SP 490742

 

Ferndown Golf Club, near Bournemouth, Dorset.

 

These roads were named after a favourite golf course by the builder, David Mitchell and his associates.

 

Ferndown Golf Club was founded in 1912. It is considered to be one of the leading courses in the South West. It has hosted many important amateur and professional events including the Women’s British Open in 1989.

Fessenden Road

Houlton, off Trouton Drive

2021

SP 558739

Reginald Aubrey Fessenden (1865-1932)

Reginald Fessenden was a Canadian born inventor who did much of his work in the USA. During his life he was awarded hundreds of patents in various fields, most notably ones related to radio and sonar. He is best known for his pioneering work developing radio technology, including the foundations of amplitude modulation (AM) radio.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Fieldfare Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive.

2001

SP 490742

Fieldfare, Turdus pilaris

The fieldfare is a thrush member of the Turdidae family. It is mainly a winter visitor to the UK, but a small number have bred here during the summer.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds. The Fieldfare is a little larger than the blackbird.

Field View

Cawston, off Gold Avenue

2004

SP 476736

Cawston playing field.

Field View overlooks the public and Bilton School playing fields.

 

Finmere

 

Brownsover, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520769

 

Finmere, Oxfordshire on the county boundary with Buckinghamshire

 

Finmere is a village and civil parish south of the River Great Ouse. It is about 4 miles west of Buckingham in Buckinghamshire and about 4 miles east of Brackley in Northamptonshire.

Finmere is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that was named after a village in or near south Northamptonshire. In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish was 466.

 

Firs Drive

 

Rugby Town Centre, off Russelsheim Way.

 

1981

 

SP 500748

 

“The Firs”

 

This road name is derived from The Firs, a private house with a large garden, on which Firs Drive was built as part of the Gyratory System development.

For many years, The Firs was the home of the BTH Girls Club.

 

Fisher Avenue

Hillmorton Paddox, off Ashlawn Road

1928

SP 524735

Benjamin Holden Fisher (1822 – 89)

He was the first secretary (1866 – 89) of the Rugby Land Society, which developed this road.

His son William Thomas Fisher (1852 – 1927) succeeded him as secretary of the Society (1889 – 1926).

Fleet Crescent

 

Rugby, Abbotts Farm Estate, off Loverock Crescent.

 

1955

SP 523745

 

John Thomas Fleet (1870-1953)

 

He had been a member of the UDC from 1921. When the UDC became a Borough in 1932, he was made an Alderman until his retirement from the Council in 1948. He was also a Mayor of Rugby (1934-35).

His occupation was as a chemist and druggist in Sheep Street.

 

Florence Avenue

Houlton, off Maine Street.

2018

SP 553737

Florence Avenue, Houlton, Maine, USA.

The first trans-Atlantic telephony signals from Rugby Radio Station were received in the USA at Houlton, Maine.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Follager Road

Rugby, off Gladstone Street

2005

SP 495757

Hugh Francis Fullagar (1872 – 1916)

He was a consulting engineer who patented a type of diesel engine. Willans and Robinson and its successor, English Electric, manufactured stationary engines to his basic design until the early 1950s.

The road was built on land formerly owned by Willans & Robinson and its successors. Rugby Borough Council admitted that they had mis-spelt the road name but said that it would be too disruptive to the residents to correct the road sign.

Foresters Place

Hillmorton, off Bucknill Crescent

1938

SP 538734

Ancient Order of Foresters

The Ancient Order of Foresters is a friendly society that used to be prominent in the village, providing assistance to villagers at a time before state pensions and the National Health Service were available.

Foresters Place was one road of a Hillmorton estate laid out in 1937 by the Borough Council. This group of roads were all given names after people or organisations associated with the village.

Fornside Close

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

SP 516774

 

Fornside, Cumbria

 

Fornside is a hamlet about 4 miles south east of Keswick. It is part of the civil parish of St John’s Castlerigg and Wythburn.

Fornside Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

(see also Wythburn Way)

Fosterd Road

Newbold Glebe Estate, off Newbold Road

1950

SP 496766

Richard Fosterd

He bequeathed land & property in Frankton to provide an income for the maintenance of the Avon Bridge in Newbold Road.

An 1835 Parliamentary report of an enquiry into Charities states that the bequest was made by a Will bearing date 10th August 1508. Elsewhere the date is given as 1558.

Fox Close

 

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

 

1978

SP 536740

 

Leonard Braines Fox (1902-71)

 

Leonard Fox had been a Ratepayer councillor on Rugby Borough Council (1937-58). Uniquely for Rugby BC, he served two separated terms as Mayor (1951-52 & 1957-58).

His occupation had been a mechanical engineer.

 

Foxglove Close

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1991

SP 520773

Common Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea

Foxglove is a well-known plant across the UK, which produces a spike of purple-pink flowers between June and September. It can grow up to 2m tall and is found in heathland, woodland edges and gardens. This pretty flower is also a valuable source of nectar for bees.

Foxglove Close is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Francis Drive

Cawston, off Stonehall Road

2001

SP 472740

Francis Boughton (1642-1707) of Cawston Hall.

Francis Boughton inherited the manor of Cawston from his uncle, William Boughton (1623-63), who died without issue.

 

When Francis died, also without issue, the manor passed to a kinsman, Edward Boughton of Church Lawford.

In his will, Francis Boughton bequeathed £400 to buy land and build a free school for the children of Dunchurch which continues to exist today (2017) as a voluntary aided Church school.

Franklin Close

 

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Nelson Way

 

 2016

SP 483539

 

John Franklin (1786-1847) KCH FRGS

 

Rear Admiral, RN.  He served in the Royal Navy from 1800 until his death in 1847. He was promoted posthumously in 1852 to Rear Admiral of the Blue because it had been presumed by the Admiralty that he was still alive.

 

Whilst in the Royal Navy he participated in several historic voyages and naval battles, including the Battle of Trafalgar in 1805 with HMS Bellerophon. He was knighted by George IV in 1829. He was Lieutenant-Governor of Van Diemen’s Land (now Tasmania) from 1836 to 1843. In 1845 he was appointed commander of his third expedition to the Arctic.The expedition was unsuccessful and all the crew members perished whilst attmpting to chart and navigate a section of the Northwest.Passage.

Frederick Press Way

 

Rugby, off Oliver Street

 

 1979

SP 498752

 

Frederick James Press (1909-64)

 

He was a member of the Rugby Borough council from 1943, including being mayor in 1953-54 and becoming an alderman in 1961. He was also appointed as a JP for Warwickshire in 1952.

 

By profession he was an architect and surveyor. In this capacity he was responsible for laying out many of the estates in Hillmorton Paddox and Southlands as well as Hart Close. Among his other interests were the Rugby Theatre and the Old Murrayian Society.

Freemantle Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1959

SP 486745

Sir Thomas Francis Fremantle, GCB, (1765 – 1819)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1815 – 1819). Despite the origin of the name, the road name has always been spelt with a double ‘e’.

Captain of HMS Neptune at Trafalgar & personal friend of Nelson. Other admirals in the Royal Navy who had this surname included Sir Edmund Robert Fremantle (1836-1929) and his eldest son, Sir Sydney Robert Fremantle (1867-1958), who were promoted to Admiral in 1896 and 1922 respectively.

Frobisher Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Lawford Lane

1964

SP 480742

Sir Martin Frobisher (c1535 – 1594)

Admiral, RN,

New World explorer who unsuccessfully sought the North West Passage.

Furness Close

 

Brownsover, off Scafell

 

1982

SP 518774

 

Furness, Cumbria

 

Furness is an area of southern Cumbria on the northern side of Morecambe Bay. The area may be split into two; Low Furness and High Furness. The former consists of the headland between the Duddon estuary in the west and Morecambe Bay to the east and includes the town of Barrow. High Furness extends into the Lake District beyond Coniston and Hawkshead and includes the Furness Fells.

Although much of Furness lies within the Lake District National Park, most of its population of 91,563 at the 2011 Census lies to the south beyond the boundary of the National Park. The borough of Barrow is by far the largest population centre, having three quarters of Furness’s total.

Furness is bounded in the west by the Duddon river and in the east by Lake Windermere.

 

Gable Close

Bilton, off Church Walk

1981

SP 485739

‘Gable House’

Gable House was an early 17th century house in extensive grounds that was destroyed by fire in May 1977.

gable Close was built on the site.

Gable House was the home of several generations of the Assheton family from 1862 when the Rev Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836-1909) came to Bilton village as its Rector (see also Assheton Close).

Gabor Close

 

Brownsover, off Kinman Way

 

1997

SP 511765

 

Dennis Gabor (1900-79) CBE FRS

see also ‘Biographies’ section of this website

Dennis Gabor was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physics (1971) for his invention of holography in 1947 whilst working at the BTH.

Dennis Gabor was born in Hungary and in 1933 fled from Nazi Germany where he was working. He then worked at the BTH in Rugby until 1948 when he moved to Imperial College, London. He became a professor of applied physics there in 1958.

 

Gabor Close was built on the former GEC/BTH factory site, having been sold off for development in about 1990.

Gainsborough Crescent

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Thomas Gainsborough RA  (1727 – 88)

English painter.

A prolific painter of portraits and landscapes.

Gardeners End

Rugby, off Addison Road.

2006

SP 489747

Croop Hill Allotments

Gardeners End was built upon the site of the former Croop Hill allotment gardens, off Addison Road.

About 9 acres of land was purchased from the Joint Hospital Board by Bilton Parish Council in 1912 to provide the Croop Hill Allotments.

Garyth Williams Close

Rugby, Overslade, off Marlborough Road

1991

SP 493738

Garyth Nicholas S Williams (1976 – 90)

When the original Mayfield Grove houses (built in 1947) were demolished in 1990 and replaced with new, the road was renamed in his memory.

Garyth died in a road accident whilst on his bicycle. He lived in one of the original Overslade Estate houses and had been one of those who had campaigned against their demolition.

Gas Street

 

Rugby, off Castle Street

 

see Notes column

 

SP 505752

 

The Rugby Gas Company

 

Town gas for Rugby was first produced in 1838 at the nearby Railway Terrace works.

 

Prior to being named as Gas Street, this street was an unnamed part of a crowded area known as “Horsepool End”, after the nearby natural pool in Church Street, frequently used for watering horses.

Gentian Way

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1992

SP 521778

Gentian – any of about 400 species of flowering plants in the family Gentianaceae

Gentians are distributed worldwide in temperate and alpine regions, especially in Europe and Asia, North and South America, and New Zealand. They are especially a notable feature of mountain regions where the moisture-loving plants have access to underground water in summer and snow cover in winter.

Gentian Way is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Gerard Road

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2002

SP 476738

Gerard de Lega

Gerard de Lega was the 11th Abbot of Pipewell Abbey in the early part of the 13th century. (His actual dates as Abbot were not recorded.) Pipewell owned much land in the Dunchurch area, including Cawston.

W Dugdale in his “Antiquities of Warwickshire” of 1656, says that the chief men of Thurlaston united to claim pasture rights on Cawston Common, but Abbot Gerard de Lega stood firm against them, and obtained a verdict in favour of the Abbey at the Warwickshire Assizes.

Gibson Drive

Lower Hillmorton, off Lower Hillmorton Road

1966

SP 527744

Sidney George Gibson (1884 – 1965)

 

He was Mayor (1955-56) and a member of the Borough Council (1947 – 58).

 

He had a plumbing & heating engineering business and served as president of the Institute of Plumbers for a year.

Gilbert Avenue

Rugby, off Addison Road

1961

SP 488746

William Gilbert (1799-1877)

William Gilbert was a boot and shoe maker in Rugby. In 1842 he moved from premises in High Street to newly erected premises in St Matthews Street. Much of his business was with Rugby School, which included the manufacture of their rugby footballs.

Following the decease of William, the business continued to be run by the Gilbert family until the second half of the twentieth century.

Althogh this family business has now been taken over by a commercial company, it has retained a world-wide reputation for the quality of its rugby footballs and they continue to be the ball of choice wherever Rugby Union Football is played.

The St Matthews Street premises became a Rugby Football museum in 1980.

Gill Crescent

Houlton, off Shaughnessy Way

2022

SP 557737

Sir Archibald Joseph Gill, BSc (Eng), FIEE, FGIRE, (1889-1976)

Sir Archibald worked for the BTH, Rugby, until he joined the Engineering Dept, of the Post Office in 1913. He played a big part in selecting Rugby as the site of the Radio Station, and in specifying the EHT machine requirements supplied by the BTH. He also helped with the development of the first Short Wave transmitter at the Rugby Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station site has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Gladstone Street

Rugby, off Avenue Road

1902

SP 494755

William Ewart Gladstone (1809 – 98)

He held 19 senior posts in government including 4 periods as Liberal prime minister between 1835 & 1894.

He represented 5 constituencies as a member of Parliament between 1832 & 1895. He was buried in the north transept of Westminster Abbey.

Glaramara Close

 

Brownsover, off Foxons Barn Road

 

1974

SP 515770

 

Glaramara Fell, Cumbria.

 

This fell is in the centre of the Lake District National Park. It is part of long ridge that runs for over six kilometres from Stonethwaite, in Borrowdale, to the mountain pass of Esk Hause.

 

Glaramara Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The summit of Glaramara, 2569 feet (783 m) high, is the central point of the ridge.

A fell is the local name for a mountain or hill.

Glebe Crescent

Rugby, off Lawford Road

1937

SP 494752

Bilton glebe land

Glebe Crescent was built on land which had formerly been the Glebe for the parish of Bilton.

In past times it was the rule that each benefice was allocated land, known as the Glebe, to provide an income for the incumbent.

Gold Avenue

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2002

SP 474737

Leonora Margaret Brooke (born 1912), who was known in Sarawak as the Princess Gold.

Princess Gold was the eldest daughter of the Rajah of Sarawak, Sir Charles Vyner de Windt Brooke, who in 1933 became the second wife of the 2nd Earl of Inchcape

The Inchcape family owned Cawston House from 1925 to 1937.during which time the estate was increased from 170 to over 400 acres and the house was improved.

Goldsmith Avenue

Rugby, Hillside, off Dunchurch Road

1964

SP 497730

Oliver Goldsmith (c1728 – 74)

He was an Irish novelist, playwright and poet. There is a memorial tablet and bust of him in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He is best known for his novel The Vicar of Wakefield, his poem The Deserted Village that laments the effect of enclosure upon traditional village life, and his play She Stoops to Conquer, a comedy of manners.

Gorse Close

Bilton, off Bracken Drive

1985

SP 493741

Common Gorse, Ulex europaeus

Common gorse is a large shrub and a member of the pea family. It provides shelter and food for many insects and birds, such as Dartford Warblers, stnechats and yellowhammers.

On the Woodlands estate, Gorse Close is one of a small group of roads that have been named after plants that grow on heathlands, moors and bogs in the UK.

Grasmere Close

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1972

SP 517770

 

Grasmere village and lake, Cumbria.

 

Grasmere is a village in the Lake District and takes its name from the nearby lake. Grasmere is about 3 miles north west of Ambleside and is within the large civil parish of Lakes that includes the town of Ambleside.

The lake is both fed and drained by the River Rothay on its way to Windermere via Rydal Water..

Grasmere Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the civil parish of Lakes had a population of 4,420.

Grasmere is one of the smaller lakes in the Lake District being 1,680 yards long, 700 yards wide and has a maximum depth of 70 feet. See also Rydal Close.

Great Borne

 

Brownsover, off Ennerdale

 

1987

SP 514775

 

Great Borne fell, Cumbria

 

Great Borne is a fell in the Lake District, It is midway between the Ennerdale and Buttermere valleys and has a summit height of 2,021 feet (616 m).

Great Borne is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

 

Great Brook Road

Houlton, off Houlton Way

2022

SP 541747

Great Brook Ground was the name of a mediaeval farm field in Hillmorton

Land enclosures resulted in Great Brook Ground field having been incorporated in Normandy Farm by the time that the farm was sold to the Government for the site of the Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and many of its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Greenhill Road

Rugby, Overslade Estate, off Wentworth Road

1948

SP 496743

Nicholas Greenhill MA (d 1604)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1581 – 1604)

He was the third Master of Rugby School.

Grendon Drive

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Staveley Way

1993

SP 521772

 

Grendon, Northamptonshire

Grendon is a village about 8 miles to the east of Northampton on the borders of Bedfordshire and Buckinghamshire.

Grendon Drive is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a village in or near to the south of Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census the population of Grendon was 544.

Grenville Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 481744

Sir Richard Grenville, Kt, (1541 – 91)

Vice- Admiral of the Fleet (1591)

He was captured and died of his wounds whilst attempting to intercept the Spanish Treasure Fleet. He also took part in the fight against the Spanish Armada in 1588.

Grizedale

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1976

SP 513773

 

Grizedale Forest, Cumbria

 

Grizedale Forest is a woodland about 6,000 acres in area. It is to the east of Coniston Water and south of Hawkshead.

There is also a hamlet named Grizedale in the middle of the Forest. This hamlet is part of the civil parish of Satterthwaite.

Grizedale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Grizedale Forest is managed by the Forestry Commission and is a popular tourist destination, having provision for several outdoor activities.

The population of Satterthwaite parish was 215 at the 2011 Census.