Roads C – D

 

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Caldecott Street

Rugby Town centre, off Hillmorton Road

1879

SP 512747

Thomas Caldecott (1798 – 1875)

Lord of the Manor of Rugby (1826 – 75);

He gave a site in Church Street, Rugby and paid for the erection of St Andrews Girls School (later known as Trinity Schools) upon it.

The land upon which Caldecott Street and Temple Street were built, was purchased by The Rugby Freehold Land Society (their Rugby Estate #2) in 1868 from the executors of the late Count Wratislaw (1788-1853).

Callier Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 476739

Nellie Gurney-Callier (1876-1956)

Miss Gurney-Callier ran Cawston House Girls School at Cawston House from 1938 to 1956. (For more information aboutCawston House see Creswell Place.)

Prior to 1938 her school was based in Leamington Spa and known as Shrublands Hall Girls School.

Calvestone Road

Cawston, off Lawford Lane

2002

SP 478743

Cawston, near Rugby, Warwickshire.

Calvestone was the name by which Cawston was known in the Domesday Book survey of 1086.

As time passed, the name Calvestone became Causton or Cawston.

The name Calvestone probably meant “Kalf’s Farm”.

Cambridge Street

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1878

SP 512752

The reason behind this street name is not known.

As Cambridge Street was built about the same time as Oxford Street, it is presumed that both streets were named after the famous University towns.

Most clergy of the established church at that time obtained their degree at either Cambridge or Oxford University.

In 745 Cambridge was referred to as Grontabricc, meaning ‘bridge on the River Granta’. The name change from Grant- to Cam- is due to Norman influence.

Campbell Road

Bilton

       

See Addison Road

Campbell Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

1890s

SP 493753

James Archibald Campbell (1807 – 1879)

An experimental & scientific dairy farmer who owned Newland Farm in New Bilton. Also a prominent Rugby businessman and magistrate.

He was resident in Rugby from about 1850 until his decease. Apart from his farm, his interests included The Rugby Advertiser (proprietor and editor 1852 to 1860), the Rugby Hospital, the Workmen’s Rest in Castle Street, the Warwickshire Scripture Readers Society and the Liberal Association.

Campion Way

Brownsover, off Newton Manor Lane

1997

SP 515776

The Red Campion, Silene dioica, and the White Campion, Silene latifolia.

Campions are flowering plants in the Genus Silen (carnation family). In the UK, the red campion is a common flower in woodlands, along hedgerows, in fields and on roadside verges and the white campion is commonly found in fields, along hedgerows, roadside verges and on waste ground.

Campion Way is one of a group of roads in Brownsover that adjoin the north of Newton Manor Lane, centred around Campion Way, and are named after wild plants that can be seen in the British Isles.

Capulet Close

 

Bilton Woodlands Estate, off Cymbeline Way

 

1966

SP 490727

 

The Capulet family of Verona, Italy, in Romeo and Juliet

 

Romeo and Juliet” is a tragedy written by William Shakespeare (1564-1616) about 1595. In it Juliet, a Capulet, is one of the two lovers whose death reconciles the Capulets with their sworn enemies the Montagues. (see also Montague Road.)

 

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

 

Caradon Way

Houlton, off Tolsford Road

2021

SP 551739

Caradon Hill Transmitting Station, Bodmin Moor, Cornwall.

The Caradon Moor transmitting station is a broadcasting and telecommunications facility. It was opened in 1963.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Carew Walk

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482744

Sir George Carew, (1504 – 45)

Admiral, RN (1545)

Sir George died when the Mary Rose foundered.

Castle Combe

Rugby, off Oulton Road

2009

SP 510770

Castle Combe Circuit, Castle Combe, Wiltshire.

Castle Combe Circuit is a venue for racing saloon, sports,and Formula Ford motor cars, and also motor cycles.

Castle Combe is one of the roads near to and off Projects Drive that are named after motor sport venues in the UK.

Catesby Road

Rugby, off Hillmorton Road

1935

SP 517744

Robert Catesby (c1572 – 1605)

He was one of the leading conspirators of the unsuccessful Gunpowder Plot of 1605.

He was the owner of Ashby St Ledgers Manor where much of the Gunpowder Plot was planned.

Cave Close

Cawston, off Trussell Way

2002

SP 470736

Margaret Cave

Margaret was the wife of Thomas Boughton (d. 1558)

Following the dissolution of the monasteries in 1538, Cawston was granted by King Henry VIII to Thomas Boughton (d. 1558) in 1545.

On his death, the estate passed to his eldest son, Thomas, and then two years later, on the death of the latter without issue, to his second son, Edward (d. 1589)

 

Cavendish Close

Cawston, off Whitefriars Drive

2004

SP 473742

William Cavendish (1552-1626), 1st Earl of Devonshire

In 1619 Cavendish married his second wife, Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Boughton (d. 1589) of Cawston. and widow of Sir Richard Wortley Kt.

Cavendish was the second son of Sir William Cavendish and Bess of Hardwick. He was ennobled as Baron Cavendish of Hardwick in 1605, and was made Earl of Devonshire in 1618. It reputedly cost him £10,900 to acquire this title.

Cawston Grange Drive

Cawston, off Coventry Road

2007

SP 474733

Cawston Grange, Warwickshire

The monks of Pipewell, a Cistercian abbey near Kettering in Northamptonshire possessed several granges in the vicinity of Dunchurch, with Cawston being the most valuable.

Following the dissolution of the monasteries in 1538, Cawston was granted by King Henry VIII to Thomas Boughton (d. 1558) in 1545.

His younger son, Edward (d. 1589), inherited the land in 1560 and built Cawston Hall on it about 1585.

Cawston Way

Bilton, off Magnet Lane

1918

SP 484736

Cawston Manor, Warwickshire.

Cawston adjoins Bilton to the SW. The Duke of Buccleuch’s family formerly owned much land there.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

Celandine

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1991

SP 520775

Lesser Celandine, Picaria verna

Lesser Celandine, or pilewort, is a low-growing hairless perennial flowering plant in the buttercup family Ranunculaceae native to Europe and Western Asia.

Celandine is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers  that can be seen in the British Isles.

Chamberlain Road

Hillmorton, off High Street

1939

SP 535735

Frederick Chamberlain (1864-1927)

Mr Chamberlain had joined the Oxford Canal Navigation Company in the 1890s as Superintendent of Works at Hillmorton. Following the resignation due to ill-health of Louis Neville, the then Chief Engineer of the company, Frederick Chamberlain was appointed as Chief Engineer of the company on the 31st October, 1900, a position he held until his decease.

Chamberlain Road was one road of a Hillmorton estate laid out in 1937 by the Borough Council. This group of roads were all given names after people or organisations associated with the village.

Mr Chamberlain’s funeral took place on Saturday, 14th May, 1927, at Arundel, Sussex, the town where his widow, Ada, was born in about 1863.

Chapel Street

Rugby Town centre, off Market Place

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503752

The Wesleyan (or Methodist) Chapel, which was erected in 1823.

The name ‘Chapel Street’ was introduced to describe the road that led from Swan Street to West Street (now Corporation street), following the erection in it of the original Methodist chapel in 1823. By the time of the 1861 census return, the former Swan Street was also known as Chapel Street.

In 1869 a new, enlarged, Methodist Church was opened in Market Place and the former chapel premises was then used by their day schools.

Charlesfield Road

Rugby, Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1949

SP 501740

The reason behind this street name is uncertain.

As the names chosen for most of the roads on the Rokeby Estate have clear associations with the family of R H Wood who owned the land on which the roads were built, ‘Charlesfield’ probably also has a family connection.

It is a distinct possibility that the first part of the road’s name refers to Mr Wood’s great nephew, Captain Charles Edward Anderson, (1890 – 1916) who was killed in action in France during WW1.

Charles Warren Close

Rugby, off Railway Terrace

1988

SP 507753

Charles George Warren (1900-1992)

The Borough Council decided to reward Charles Warren for a lifetime of service dedicated to the town and community.

The close was built approximately on the route of Pinders Lane when the area between James Street and Railway Terrace was redeveloped. (see also Pinders Lane.)

Charles Warren had been employed by the Council as a road sweeper for forty years. He also worked as a volunteer for the St Johns Ambulance for much of his life.

In the Rugby Advertiser dated August 20, 1987, Mr Warren said that he was delighted to have a street named after him.

Charlotte Street

Rugby, off Railway Terrace

1868

SP 507753

Charlotte Anne Wratislaw, née Keele (1799 – 1863)

This street was developed by Charlotte’s husband Count William Ferdinand Wratislaw (1788 – 1853) on land that he owned.

see also William Street

Charter Road

 

Rugby, off Balcombe Road

 

1934

 

SP 520737

 

Rugby Borough Council

 

Charter Road was named to commemorate the town receiving its Charter of Incorporation as a Borough, having previously been an urban district.

 

Thomas Arnold Wise (see also Wise Grove) was made ‘Charter Mayor’ for the incorporation ceremony. The Royal Charter was presented to him by the Right Honourable Sir Austen Chamberlain MP on behalf of King George V.

Charwelton Drive

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Staveley Way

 

1993

SP 520770

 

Charwelton, Northamptonshire.

 

Charwelton is a village and civil parish about 5 miles south of Daventry. Its name is derived from the River Cherwell which runs through the village.

Charwelton Drive is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after a village in or near the south of Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census the civil parish had a population of 220.

Chaucer Road

Rugby, Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

 

SP 498728

Geoffrey Chaucer (c1340 – 1400)

Hw was an administrator who held many important royal posts. He is also one of the greatest english poets.

He was buried in Westminster Abbey and the part of the south transept where his memorial exists is now known as Poets Corner.

Today he is best known as the author of The Canterbury Tales.

Cherry Terrace

Rugby

       

See Plowman Street

Cheshire Close

Bilton, off Lawford Lane

1967

SP 482738

Leslie Jack Cheshire (1900-76) OBE

 

He was a mechanical engineer of some note. He joined the BTH in 1922, later moving to English Electric. He collaborated with Sir Frank Whittle in the development of the jet engine for aircraft for which he was awarded the OBE in June 1947.

He lived for many years in Church Walk, Bilton. He was chairman of the Rugby Liberal Association.

On his retirement in 1963, he moved away from Rugby.

Chicory Drive

Brownsover, off Webb Drive

1991

SP 517776

Chicory, Cichorium intybus

Chicory is a herb that is native to Europe and Asia.

Chicory Drive is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Chimes Court

Rugby, off Barnaby Road

2014

SP 504765

“The Chimes”

The Chimes is a short novel written by Charles Dickens in 1844.

The streets in  this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Church Road

Rugby

       

See Church Walk

Church Street

Rugby Town Centre, from Market Place

see Notes column

SP 503752

The parish church of St Andrew

The parish church has been situated in Church Street since the 12th century.

Church Street is one of the ancient streets of the town and is where Lawrence Sheriff founded the Grammar School that became Rugby School.

It is one of the few roads in Rugby which is numbered continuously rather than having odd numbers on one side and even numbers on the other.

Church Walk

Rugby Town Centre, off Lawrence Sheriff Street

 

SP 505749

The parish church of St Andrew

This road/footpath leads to the parish church from Lawrence Sheriff Street.

Church Wa;lk, otherwise known as Church Road, is an ancient roadway.

Until 1891 the part of Church Walk that adjoined Lawrence Sheriff Street was named Church Road.

Churchill Road

Rugby, St Maries Estate, off Dunchurch Road

1958

SP 501745

Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill KG, OM, CH, TD, PC, DL, FRS, RA (1874 – 1965)

He was a statesman who was British Prime Minister from 1940 to 1945 and from 1951 to 1955. During his time over fifty years as a British politician, in addition to being Prime Minister he held many other government offices.

Churchill was also an officer in the British Army, a historian, a writer and an artist. His writings included two biographies, three volumes of memoirs and several histories. He was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1953.

In 1920, Churchill rented School Field, the Rugby home of H C Bradby, for the six week polo season.

Claremont Road

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1897

SP 511751

Possibly named after the Claremont mansion, near Esher, Surrey.

Claremont mansion was the residence of several distinguished people between 1708 & 1930.

Having initially been built only as far as Wells Street, Claremont Road was extended in 1905 to Craven Road.

At the time the road was built in Rugby, the mansion was the residence of Princess Helena, (1861 – 1922), the widow of Prince Leopold (1853 – 84), Duke of Albany, the fourth and youngest son of Queen Victoria.

Clarence Road

New Bilton, off Campbell Street

1899

SP 494754

Prince Albert Victor Christian Edward, Duke of Clarence and Avondale (1864 – 92)

He was the eldest son of King Edward VII, who he predeceased.

Duke of Clarence is a title which has been traditionally awarded to junior members of the English and British Royal families.

Clement Way

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2002

SP 472736

Ingelramus (or Ingelram) Clement

Ingelramus Clement, with his son William,  granted to the Abbey of Pipewell most of the land in Cawston that Clement had obtained, probably about 1150, from Siward de Ardern, the son of Turchil (see also Turchill Road).

The grant to Pipewell Abbey was confirmed by William before the Justices Itinerant at Northampton in 1171.

Clifton Road

Rugby, off Church Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 506751

Clifton upon Dunsmore village

Part of the historic route from Rugby to Clifton. Apart from the Whitehall, the only building on Clifton Road to the east of Bath Street on the 1850 detailed map of Rugby parish was Bell’s Farm.

It became part of the Rugby and Harborough Turnpike (1801 – 78).

Clifton View Close

Houlton, off Great Brook Ground

2022

SP 541747

Clifton View Close was the name of a mediaeval farm field in Hillmorton.

Land enclosures resulted Clifton View Close field having been incorporated in Normandy Farm by the time the farm was sold to the Government for the Radio Station.

The residential development of the formerRugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it, and the further development of radio.

Clover Close

Brownsover, off Chicory Drive

1992

SP 516777

Clover is the common name for plants of the genus Trifolium.

There are about 300 species of flowering plants, commonly known as clover, in the genus Trifolium. They are members of the legume or pea family Fabaceae originating in Europe.

Clover C;ose is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Collingwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1958

SP 487745

Cuthbert Collingwood, 1st Baron Collingwood, (1748 – 1810)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1805 – 1810)

Was second in command to Admiral Nelson at Trafalgar in 1805 in the Royal Sovereign.

Columbia Street

Houlton off Maine Street

2018

SP 551738

Columbia Street, Houlto, Maine, USA.

The first trans-Atlantic telephony signals from Rugby Radio Station were received in the USA at Houlton, Maine.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Coniston Close

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1972

SP 515769

 

Coniston village and Coniston Water.

 

Coniston lies on the western shore of Coniston Water, about 6 miles to the south west of Ambleside. About two miles to the west of Coniston is Coniston Old Man, whose summit is 2,634 feet (803m) high.

 

Coniston Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Coniston Water is the third longest lake in the Lake District.

The population of Coniston at the 2011 Census was 928.

Conrad Close

Rugby, Hillside, off Norton Leys

1972

SP 497729

Joseph Conrad (1857 – 1924) [formerly Józef Teodor Konrad Korzeniowski]

Following a career in the merchant navy of France and later of Great Britain, he became a writer in English of novels and short stories that received both critical and popular acclaim.

He was born of Polish parents and became a British subject in 1886.

Constable Road

Lower Hillmorton, off Brindley Road

1966

SP 536741

John Constable RA (1776 – 1837)

 English Romantic painter.

He is known particularly for his landscape paintings of the area around Dedham Vale in Suffolk—now known as “Constable Country”.

Cook Close

 

Brownsover, off Stonehills

 

1972

SP 512771

Joan Lily Cook, (1914-80)

 

Miss Cook started teaching during WW2 and continued until she retired about 1973. She was head of Northlands First School in Pinders Lane for the last 15 years of her career.

Cook Close is one of a small group of roads In Brownsover that were named after former head teachers in the Borough.

Miss Cook was born in Rugby and educated at the Rugby High School, Kings College and London University. In her later life she was a governor of several of Rugby’s schools.

In 1979 she married William H R Hartwell.

Copeland

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1977

SP 513773

 

Copeland Forest

 

Copeland is one of the ancient forests of the Lake District and is located to the north of Wast Water.

 

Copeland is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Copeland is now also the name of a parliamentary constituency. It was created in 1983 from the former constituency of Whitehaven and boundary changes in 2010 have since extended it eastwards to include the town of Keswick.

Copperfield Close

Rugby, off Barnaby Road

2015

SP 504764

David Copperfield

The hero of the eponymously entitled novel written by Charles Dickens in 1850.

The streets in this area were given nammes associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Copt Oak Road

Houlton, off St Gabriels Way

2021

SP 555734

Copt Oak.near Colville, Leicestershire.

Copt Oak was a BT microwave transmission station that was also used amongst others, for training riggers employed at the Rugby Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further further development of radio.

Corbett Street

 

Rugby, off Hunter Street

1884

SP 514754

Archibald Cameron Corbett (1856 – 1933), 1st Baron Rowallan

The street was built by Thomas Hunter (1827-88) the founder of the Thomas Hunter Wagon Works in Mill Road, It was named after Corbett by Hunter who was a supporter of the Liberal Party.

Corbett unsuccessfully contested the bye-election in June 1884 for the seat of North Warwickshire as a Liberal. This constituency included Rugby.

Cordelia Way

 

Woodlands Estate, Bilton, off Cymbeline Way

1966

SP 492726

 

Cordelia

 

Cordelia is King Lear’s youngest and favourite daughter. “King Lear” is a tragedy that was written by William Shakespeare about 1605.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

Cornflower Drive

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1998

SP 516778

Cornflower, Centaurea cyanus

The cornflower is an annual flowering plant in the familly Asteraceae. The cornflower is native to temperate Europe and was introduced to the British Isles during the Iron Age.

Cornflower Drive is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Cornwallis Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1961

SP 480743

Sir William Cornwallis GCB, (1744 – 1819)

Admiral, RN (1799 – 1806)

He commanded the Channel Fleet from 1801 to 1804.

Corporation Street

 

Rugby, off Newbold Road

 

1957

 

SP 501755

 

see Reason column

 

This name was chosen by the Borough Council as “the road would be the first new road in the central part of the town for a considerable time”.

 

West Street that was replaced by Corporation Street, marked the western limit of the built up part of the town until further developments took place in the 1830s.

There are no residential properties on this road.

Coton Road

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1961

SP 530739

John Coton

He was the Vicar of Hillmorton St John the Baptist from 1442 to 1447.

Coton Road is one of a small group of roads in Hillmorton that were named after former vicars of St John the Baptist.

Cotterell Road

 

Newbold on Avon, off Norman Road

1949

 

SP 496767

Elizabeth Cotterell (1828-97)

 

Elizabeth was the wife (m. 1853) of the Rev. Theodosius Boughton-Leigh, vicar of Newbold on Avon

Her father was Thomas Cotterell, who had been a High Sheriff of London and Middlesex. in 1851.

Coverley Place

New Bilton, off Pendred Road

1937

SP 492750

Sir Roger de Coverley

He was a fictional character in The Spectator, who exemplified the values of an old country gentleman, “rather beloved than esteemed”.

See also Steele Street.

The Council felt that the road should be given a name associated with Addison because it was near to Addison Road. It is also the name of an English country dance.

Cowan Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road

1970

SP 480744

Sir Walter Henry Cowan KCB, (1871 – 1956)

Admiral, RN (1927 – 31).

Although long since retired from the Royal Navy, he saw action with the Commandos in WW2 at the age of seventy.

Craven Road

Rugby, off Railway Terrace

c 1884

SP 508757

Presumably named after the Craven family, latterly the Earls of Craven.

Combe Abbey was the residence of the Craven family from 1622 to 1923. The road was initially named Craven Street

The Craven family held the patronage of St Andrew’s Church, Rugby from 1767 to the 20th century.

Craven Street

Rugby

       

See Craven Road

Creswell Place

Cawston, off Whitefriars Drive

2005

SP 473742

Harry Bulkley Creswell FRIBA (1869-1960)

H B Creswell almost entirely rebuilt Cawston Lodge in 1907 for the 6th Duke of Buccleuch. It then became known as Cawston House.

During the early part of the 20th century, Creswell was one of the country’s foremost architects. Among his designs was the turbine factory that was built in 1901-06 for Willans & Robinson at Queensferry, Flintshire. He was also the author of a number of novels.

Croft Avenue

Rugby, off Projects Drive

2008

SP 509768

Croft Circuit, Dalton-on-Tees, Darlington.

Croft Circuit hosts various motor car racing events, including rally cross.

Croft Circuit is one of the roads near to and off Projects Drive that are named after motor sport venues in the UK.

Cromwell Road

Rugby, off Hillmorton Road

1905

SP 518747

Oliver Cromwell (1599-1658)

 

Cromwell, a Puritan, became the 1st Lord Protector of the Common-wealth of England, Scotland and Ireland (1653-58) following the Civil War.

 

It is said that non-conformists “who once were the main inhabitants of that part of the town” had their way in the naming of Cromwell Road. The road was laid out by the Rugby Freehold Land Society on Naseby’s Field which they purchased in 1902. (see also Naseby Road.)

Crookes Road

Houlton, off Trouton Road

2022

SP 557738

William Crookes (1832-1919). He was appointed as a Knight Bachelor in 1879.

William Crookes was a British chemist and physicist who was a pioneer of vacuum tubes, inventing the Crookes tube which was made in 1875. This was a foundational discovery that eventually changed the whole of chemistry and physics. His work led to the development of the cathode ray tube. High powered thermionic valves were an essential part of the most recent transmitters at Rugby Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Culworth Close

 

Brownsover, Avon Park, off Charwelton Drive

 

1993

SP 521770

 

Culworth, Northamptonshire

 

Culworth is a village and civil parish about 7 miles north of Brackley and about 7 miles north east of Banbury.

 

Culworth Close is one of a small group of roads in Brownsover that were named after villages in or near South Northamptonshire.

In the 2011 Census the civil parish had a population of 445.

Cunningham Way

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1964

SP 482745

Andrew Browne Cunningham, 1st Viscount Cunningham of Hyndhope (1883 – 1963)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1943 – 1946)

Became 1st Sea Lord during WW2.

Curie Close

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1995

SP 515752

Marie Skłodowska-Curie (1867 – 1934)

Polish physicist and chemist, famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity

Curie Close is on former site of Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after her.

Curiosity Close

Rugby, off Expectations Drive

2016

SP 505764

The Old Curiosity Shop.”

The Old Curiosity Shop is a novel written by Charles Dickens in 1841.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Cymbeline Way

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Longrood Road

 

1966

SP 496728

 

Cymbeline, King of Britain

 

Cymbeline was a play written by William Shakespeare. It is not known when he wrote it, but the first known production was in 1611.

In the play, King Cymbeline was the Celtic King of Britain in thrall to the Romans.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

Cypress Road

Brownsover, off Lower Lodge Avenue

2013

SP 510779

Leyland Cypress

The Leyland cypress is a sterile cross between the Monterey cypress and the Nootka cypress, both being North American coniferous species. It is thought that the two species cross bred in Wales in the 19th century. and the Leyland cypress is now commonly used in the UK as a hedging plant.

The roads in the area off Lower Lodge Avenue, Brownsover, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Dalkeith Avenue

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1912

SP 486735

Earl of Dalkeith

The eldest son and heir to the Duke of Buccleuch is given the courtesy title of Earl of Dalkeith.

The Dukes of Buccleuch and their family members owned much land in Dunchurch and Bilton in the 19th century.

The name was suggested by the developers, the Rugby Provident Permanent Benefit Building Society. This Society has now merged with the Hinckley Building Society to become the Hinckley and Rugby Building Society.

David Road

Bilton, off Barton Road

1955

SP 490736

Dr Albert Augustus David (1867 – 1950)

Headmaster of Rugby School (1910 – 21) & Bishop of Liverpool (1923 – 44)

He was also a master at Rugby School (1892 – 99) and headmaster of Clifton School (1905 – 09). As headmaster of Rugby School his unorthodox views on teaching met with considerable opposition in some quarters.

Deane Road

Hillmorton, off Wesley Road

1955

SP 534739

The Right Rev Frederick Llewellyn Deane (1868 – 1952).

He was Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney (1917 – 43). Whilst a teenager he had attended a private school in Rugby, from where he matriculated in 1887 at Keble College, Oxford.

His father, the Rev Francis Hugh Deane (1820 – 1904), had briefly been a curate at Hillmorton (1847- 49) and later was the Rector of South Kilworth, Leics (1887 – 1904).

De Forest Road

Houlton, off Houlton Way

2022

SP 556739

Lee De Forest (1873-1961)

Lee De Forest was an American inventor and a fundamentally important early pioneer in electronics. He invented the first practical electronic amplifier, the the three-element “Audion” triode vacuum tube in 1906.This helped start the Electronic Age, and enabled the development of the electronic oscillator. These made radio broadcasting and long distance telephone lines possible, and led to to the development of talking motion pictures, among countless other applications.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Derwent Close

 

Brownsover, off Foxons Barn Road

 

1971

SP 513769

 

Derwent Water, Cumbria

 

Derwent Water is a lake in Borrowdale adjacent to the town of Keswick in the Lake District. The River Derwent flows through the lake.

Derwent Water is approximately 3 miles long by 1 mile wide and has a maximum depth of about 72 feet.

 

Derwent Close is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Alternatively it could have been named after the River Derwent in the Peak District, Derbyshire, as a small number of roads in Brownsover were named after places in this National Park. This River Derwent is about 50 miles long and flows into the River Trent, near to Derby.

Devonshire Close

Cawston, off Calvestone Road

2004

SP 477742

William Cavendish (1552-1626), 1st Earl of Devonshire

Cavendish’s second wife was Elizabeth, daughter of Edward Boughton (d. 1589) of Cawston and widow of Sir Richard Wortley. (see also Wortley Close)

Cavendish was made Earl of Devonshire in 1618. It reputedly cost him £10,900 to acquire this title.

(see also Cavendish Close.)

Dewar Close

Bilton, off Beech Drive

2016

SP 485739

William Dewar (1846 – 1917)

He was chairman of Rugby Urban District Council (1909 – 12). He was also an an assistant master at Rugby School from 1888 – 1911.

Dewar Close provides long term residential care and short trm respite care for people living with dementia, as well as older people with long term physical conditions.

Dewar Grove

Hillmorton, Abbott’s Farm Estate, off McKinnell Crescent

1965

SP 524750

William Dewar (1846 – 1917)

He was chairman of Rugby Urban District Council (1909 – 12).

He was also an assistant master at Rugby School from 1888 – 1911.

Dewsbury Close

Houlton, off Ripon Way

2023

SP 550737

Dewsbury Minster, the Parish Church of All Saints at Dewsbury in the West Riding of Yorkshire.

Dewsbury Parish Church was founded in the 13th century although the area had been a place of worship since 627AD. It was re-built in 1895 and was re-dedicated as a minster church in 1994.

Dewsbury Close is one of a group of roads in the south of Houlton that were named after monasteries or minsters of the English church that were founded mainly during the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons in the seventh and eighth centuries.

Dickens Road

Rugby, Hillside, off Norton Leys

1964

SP 497730

Charles John Huffam Dickens (1812 -70)

Throughout his literary career Dickens wrote many novels whose success made him the most popular novelist of the 19th century.

He was buried in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

He wrote fifteen novels, most of which were the best-sellers of the day. They were serialized in weekly and monthly magazines before being published in standard book format. Amongst his many other writings were a large number of short stories including several Christmas-themed stories, and several non-fiction works.

Ditton Close

Bilton, off Nelson Way

1950

SP 482738

Thames Ditton, Surrey

Willans and Robinson, which was one of the businesses that amalgamated in 1918 to form English Electric, made high-speed reciprocating steam engines at their Ferry Works site at Thames Ditton, from the 1870s until they moved to Rugby in 1896.

The houses in Ditton Close were built to provide accommodation for English Electric employees.

Dogge/Dog Lane

Rugby, off North Street

 

 

 

 

See Windmill Lane

Dolbear Road

Houltpn, off Braun Road

2023

SP 558739

Amos Dolbear (1837-1910)

Amos Dolbear was an American physicist and inventor who researched electrical spark conversion into sound waves and electrical impulses. He invented the first telephone receiver with a permanent magnet in 1865, eleven years before Alexander Graham Bell patented his model.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Dollman Road

Houlton, off Crick Road

2017

SP 554734

Dollman Farm

Dollman Farm (267 acres) was purchased in 1923 for use as part of the site of Rugby Radio Station. Its former owner was T W Cockerill.

Dollman is a variant of the mediaeval term ‘Doleman’, a village official responsible for areas of common land.

The residential deveopment of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Dorrit Place

Rugby, off Barnaby Road

2015

SP 504762

Amy Dorrit, known as “Little Dorrit.

Little Dorrit is a novel that was written by Charles Dickens in 1855.

The streets in this area were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Dovedale Close

 

Brownsover, off Hollowell Way

 

1975

 

SP 512773

 

Dovedale, Derbyshire

 

Dovedale is a valley in the Peak District that was cut by the River Dove through the surrounding limestone rock in the ice age. The valley runs for about 3 miles from Milldale in the north and a wooded ravine near Thorpe Cloud and Bunster Hill in the south and is about 3 miles north of Ashbourne, the nearest town.

Dovedale Close is a road in Brownsover that was named after a place in the Peak District National Park.

Dovedale is in the south of the National Park and is now one of the most visited natural tourist sites in Britain.

 

Drayton Leys

Rugby, off Orson Leys

1973

SP 500731

The hamlet of Drayton within the parish of Daventry, Northants.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose communities in Northamptonshire is not known.

Dreyer Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cornwallis Road.

1990s

SP 481748

Sir Frederic Charles Dreyer GBE, KCB (1878 – 1956)

Admiral, RN (1932 – 43)

His son, Sir Desmond Parry Dreyer (1910 – 2003), was also an admiral.

Drury Lane

Rugby, off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 504750

Drury Lane Theatre, London

It was a mediaeval lane. Previously known as Back Lane and then Tinkers Lane.

A troupe of players from the London theatre played there.

Dryden Place and Dryden Walk

New Bilton, off Steele Street

1935

SP 491751

John Dryden (1631 – 1700).

He was an English poet, literary critic and playwright who became Poet Laureate in 1688.

The Council felt that these roads should be given a name associated with Addison’s contemporaries because they were near to Addison Road.

Dryden is buried in the Poets Corner of Westminster Abbey.

Duffy Place

 

Hillmorton, off High Street

 

1968

 

SP 532736

 

Thomas Leo Duffy (1906-73)

 

He joined the staff of the Rugby UDC in 1928 and became assistant town clerk in 1930.  He was then appointed as town clerk of Rugby Borough Council in 1954 until his retirement in 1966.

T L Duffy was a native of Middlesborough and started his career in the town clerk’s department in the county borough of Darlington. He was appointed as an honorary freeman of the Borough of Rugby, for his long and distinguished service to the town.

Dukes Jetty

Rugby Town Centre, off High Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 503751

Arthur Joseph Dukes (1887 – 1965)

Mayor of Rugby (1949 – 50).

This short passage or “jetty” is of ancient origin, but was not named until 1956.

The Dukes’ family for many years had an ironmongery and grocery business in Sheep Street, Rugby. In its early days the entrance to their residence was in the “jetty”.

Duncan Drive

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Juliet Drive

 

1968

SP 486725

 

Duncan, King of Scotland

 

Duncan features in Macbeth a tragedy written about 1606.by William Shakespeare (1564-1616).

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

Dunchurch Road

Rugby, off Warwick Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 502750

Dunchurch Village

This was the historic route between Rugby & Dunchurch, and known as the Dunchurch road.

Matthew Bloxam recalled that in 1813 there were no buldings in Dunchurch Road for upward of two miles, the area opposite the School playing fields being a corn field.

It probably started out as a bridle way. The first quarter mile between Warwick Street & Oak Street was known by the mid-Victorians as Dunchurch Street. It became part of the Rugby & Lutterworth Turnpike (1785 – 1878).

In the Domesday Book it was named as ‘Duneschirche’. The meaning of this old English name was probably “church of a man called Dun(n)”.

Dunchurch Street

Rugby, off Warwick Street

       

See Dunchurch Road

Dunnerdale

 

Brownsover, off Helvellyn Way

 

1982

SP 517773

 

Hall Dunnerdale, Cumbria

 

Hall Dunnerdale is a hamlet within the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite which is spread along the Duddon valley of the Lake District. It is located about 6 miles north of Broughton in Furness and 34 miles west of Kendall.

Dunnerdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the civil parish of Dunnerdale with Seathwaite was 119.

Durrell Drive

Cawston, off Trussell Way

2002

SP 470734

George Darrell

George Darrell married Susanna Boughton, widow, (nee Brockett) at Newbold on Avon in 1591. She was the relict of Edward Boughton of Cawston (d. 1589).

Although George’s surname was spelt as ‘Darrell’ in the 1591 parish record of the marriage, spelling was inconsistent at that time and ‘Durrell’ as in the modern road name could have been an alternative spelling.

Dyson Close

Hillmorton, off Featherbed Lane

1965

SP 541742

Frank Dyson (1886 – 1969)

Having been elected to Rugby Rural District Council in 1919, he then became a member of the newly-formed Borough Council from 1932 to 1955. He was also Mayor of Rugby (1946-47).

He was also a builder and undertaker in Hillmorton.