Roads A – B

 

Road Name

Area

 Date

Grid Ref.

Person/ Place

Reason

Notes

Abbey Street

Rugby, off Murray Road

1893

SP 511758

It is reputed that the street was named after George Abbey (1848- 1938)

In the 1880s he was the owner of a “hansom cab” which he used to collect people from the railway station.

Family members say that he had stables in Abbey Street. In the 1880s he was living in Spring Street and was described as a cab driver and beer retailer. By 1901 he was the landlord of the ‘Woolpack’ in Lower Street, Hillmorton.

Acacia Grove

Rugby, off Lancaster Road

c1914

SP 503758

 It is said to have been so named because the pavement was originally lined with Acacia trees.

Acacia trees are natives of tropical and sub-tropical areas of the world, particularly in Australia and Africa.

See also Maple, Poplar & Sycamore Groves.

Acer Close

Brownsover, off Redwood Road

2018

SP 508779

Sycamore, Acer pseudoplatanus

The sycamore is a deciduous, broad-leafed tree native to to central, eastern and southern Europe. It was probably introduced into the UK in the Middle Ages and is now a naturalised species.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the West of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Acorn Drive

Bilton, off Bilton Lane

1989

SP 476745

Acorn

The acorn is a nut which is the fruit of the oak tree. The english oak tree, Quercus roburs, is a deciduous tree which is native to the UK.

Acorn Drive is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Adams Street

New Bilton, off Lawford Road

1905

SP 494753

George Adams (1830-1908)

George Adams was the first full-time Secretary of the Rugby Co-operative Society (1875-1903) and after that was its General Overseer until his death.

The Rugby Co-operative Society built the houses in Adams Street for their employees.

Addison Road

Between Bilton Road, Bilton, and Lawford Road, New Bilton.

1880s

SP 491753

Joseph Addison (1672 – 1719)

Essayist, poet and politician. Addison owned the manor of Bilton and resided in Bilton Hall from 1711 to 1719. In 1716, he married Charlotte (1680 -1731), the widow of Richard, 6th Earl of Warwick.

See also Steele Street.

A memorial statue of Addison is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Prior to 1954 the part of the present day Addison Road between Bilton Road and Sow Brook was named as Campbell Road and the hill section from Sow Brook to the cemetery entrance was known as Croop Hill.

Campbell Road was presumably named after James Archibald Campbell (1807 – 1879), see Campbell Street, New Bilton.

Adkinson Avenue

Dunchurch, off Coventry Road.

1949

SP 483714

Emma Adkinson, nee Earlam, (1877-1946)

Arthur Lewis Adkinson (1876-1954) nominated the name of this road in memory of his deceased wife, Emma Adkinson.

Arthur Lewis Adkinson (1876-1954) was chairman of the former Rugby Rural District Council from 1949 to 1951, having represented Dunchurch on the Council since 1928. He was also elected as a member of Warwickshire County Council in 1929 and became an Alderman in 1938. In that year he was appointed as a Justice of the Peace.

Albert Square

Rugby, off Albert Street

1990

SP 507754

Albert Joseph Richardson (1811 – 68)

(see also Albert Street)

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 – 1861), owned the land on which Albert Square was made.

Mrs Richardson inherited considerable land in 1828 when her husband, James Richardson, died. Albert Joseph was her oldest son.

Albert Street

Rugby own Centre, off Church Street

1851

SP 505752

Albert Joseph Richardson (1811 – 68).

His mother, Mrs Anne Richardson (1791 – 1861) owned the land on which Albert Street was made.

Mrs Richardson inherited considerable land in 1828 when her husband, James Richardson, died. Albert Joseph was her oldest son. See also James Street.

Alexandra Road

Rugby, off Wood Street

1904

SP 507758

Alexandra of Denmark (1844 – 1925)

She was the wife of the then reigning British monarch, King Edward VII (1901 – 10). (see also King Edward Road)

She married Edward, Prince of Wales, in 1863. Their coronation was in 1902.

Alexanderson Road

Houlton, off De Forest Road

2022

SP 552740

Ernst Frederick Werner Alexanderson (1878-1975)

Born in Sweden, Ernst Alexanderson emigrated to the USA in 1902, and spent much of his lifeworking for General Electric and the Radio Corporation of America

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Alfred Green Close

Rugby, off Dunchurch Road

1978

SP 501744

Alfred Thomas Green (1918 – 76)

Alderman & Mayor of Rugby Borough Council (1968 – 69)

He was also a Borough councillor (1958 – 76) and an estate agent in the Town.

Alicia Close

Cawston, off Gerard Road

2002

SP 472738

Alicia Anne Spottiswoode (1810-1900)

Alicia was a Scottish songwriter and composer. Today she is chiefly known as the composer of the tune for “Annie Laurie”.

(see also Spottiswood Close.)

In 1836, Alicia married the Rt. Hon. John Douglas Montagu-Douglas-Scott, who, in 1827, had inherited the Buccleuch estates in the Dunchurch area, including Cawston, which became their chief residence.

Allesley Road

Newbold, off Norman Road

1949

SP 497769

Boughton-Leigh family.

Allesley is one of the Boughton-Leigh family names.

In St Botolph’s Church in Newbold there is a tomb for Sir Geoffrey de Allesley who died in 1401.

Alwyn Road

off Main Street, Bilton

1934

SP 482736

It is said to have been named after Alwyn Wootton Crowther (1922-2000).

His father Thomas Edward Crowther (1893-1963) owned part of the land on which the road was built.

Thomas Edward Crowther was an agent and building society branch manager and in 1932 was elected to the first Rugby Borough Council.

Ambleside

 

Brownsover, off Buttermere

 

1974

SP 518770

 

Ambleside, Cumbria

 

Ambleside is a town about a mile from the head of Lake Windermere, England’s largest lake.

 

Ambleside is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

Ambleside had a population of 2,600 in the 2011 Census.

Anderson Avenue

Rugby, Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1939

SP 501740

Anne Rose Anderson, née Wood, (1852 – 1940).

She was the niece of Richard Henry Wood. She married William Henry Anderson (1846 – 1911) in 1885.

She inherited Rokeby House in 1908 from Richard Henry Wood.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former farm estate attached to Rokeby House

Angwin Avenue

Houlton, off Maxwell Road

2017

SP 555735

Sir Arthur Stanley Angwin, KCMG, KBE, BSc, DSO, (1883-1959)

He was the designer of the 820ft, ;ong-wave masts used at Rugby Radio Station. He later became the Engineer-in-Chief of the Post Office (1939-46)

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Anson Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 483747

George Anson, 1st Baron Anson, (1697 – 1762)

Admiral, RN (1746 – 61)

Anson circumnavigated the world (1740 – 44) & captured the Manila Spanish treasure galleon. Was 1st Lord of the Admiralty (1751 – 62).

Anthorn Close

Houlton, off Tolsford Road

2022

SP 552740

Anthorn Radio Station, Cumbria

The MSF Time Signal Service was transferred in April 2007 from the Rugby Radio Station to the Anthorn Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Apple Grove

Bilton, off Mulberry Road

1987

SP 478746

Apple

An apple is an edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus domestica). Apple trees are cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species of the genus Malus in the UK.

Apple Grove is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Arden Close

 

Bilton, Woodlands Estate, off Montague Road

 

1971

SP 490725

 

Forest of Arden

 

The Forest of Arden is the setting of “As You Like It“, a comedy written by William Shakespeare in 1599. Arden may be either the forest of the same name in Warwickshire or may refer to the forested area of the Ardennes in north east France.

When the Woodlands Estate was laid out in 1964 the Council selected road names “having regard to the quarter centenary of Shakespeare’s birth” in 1564.

 

Ariel Way

Bilton, Woodlamds Estate, off Wolsey Road

1964

SP 488726

“Ariel” is a spirit who does the bidding of Prospero, the overthrown Duke of Milan.

Ariel is a character in “The Tempest”, a play by William Shakespeare that was written in 1610/11. Prospero is the main character in the play.

The names of most roads in the Woodlands Estate were selected by the Council “with regard to the quarter-centenary of the birth of Shakespeare.” (see also Shakespeare Gardens.)

Arnold Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Railway Terrace

1874

SP 507754

Dr Thomas Arnold DD (1795 – 1842)

Headmaster, Rugby School (1828 – 42)

Dr Arnold was famous for reforming the way the School was run, & turning its fortunes around.

Arnold Villas

Rugby, off Church Walk

before 1862

SP 505750

Thomas Arnold DD (1795- 1842)

Headmaster, Rugby School(1828-1842)

Dr Arnold was famous for reforming the way that Rugby School was run, and turning its fortunes around.

Ashman Avenue

Long Lawford, off Round Avenue

1958

SP 476763

Norman Ashman (1892-1961)

Norman Ashman, on his death, had been a member of the former Rugby Rural District Council for 27 years, and was its chairman from 1955 to 1957. He was also elected as a member of Warwickshire County Council shortly before his death.

Norman Ashman was employed by the City Engineer’sdepartment at Coventry from 1934 until he retired in 1957. He was also clerk to several Warwickshire parish councils.

Aspen Close

Brownsover, off Aspen Road

2014

SP 511780

Aspen, Populus tremula

The Aspen is a deciduous, broad -leaf tree, native to the UK and most of Europe.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Aspen Road

Brownsover, off Lower Lodge Avenue

2013

SP 510780

Aspen, Populus tremula

The Aspen is a deciduous, broad-leaf tree, native to the UK and most of Europe.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Aspen Walk

Brownsover, off Aspen Road

2013

SP 511780

Aspen, Populus tremula

The aspen is a deciduous, broad-leaf tree, native to the UK and most of Europe.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue. to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Assheton Close

 

Bilton, off Magnet Lane

 

1965

 

SP 482736

 

The Assheton family

 

This family had a long association with Bilton from 1862 when the Rev Richard Orme Assheton MA (1836-1909) came to the village as its Rector (1862-1900).

 

Other prominent members of the Assheton family to live in Bilton were

1) the Rev William Orme Assheton (1866-1953), who succeeded his uncle, R O Assheton, as rector, and

2) William’s son Nicholas Master Assheton (1905-94) who was mayor of Rugby in 1965-66.

Astley Place

Hillmorton, off Bucknill Crescent

1940

SP 536735

Astley family members

The Astley family were Lords of the Manor of Hillmorton from 1166 when Philip de Astley obtained possession. The manor remained in their hands until it was sold to Mr James Vere in 1771.

In the reign of Henry III, a charter was granted to Thomas de Astley, then Lord of the Manor of Hillmorton, for a weekly Market on a Saturday, and an annual Fair, to begin on the eve of St John the Baptist, and to continue for three days.

Astley Place was one road of a Hillmorton estate laid out in 1937 by the Borough Council. This group of roads were all given names after people or organisations associated with the village.

Avocet Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2002

SP 515783

Avocet, Recurvirostra Avocetta

The Avocet is a British wader with a distinctive up-curved black bill and a white and black plumage.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Back Lane

Rugby

       

See Brury Lane

Badby Leys

Rugby, off Orson Leys

1964

SP 499732

Badby village, near Daventry, Northants

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

Badby’s origin is pre-Domesday and its name consists of an Old English personal name (Badda) and an Old Scandinavian (i.e. Viking) element, by, meaning ‘farmstead.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Bank Street

Rugby, off Regent Street

1901

SP 504753

It is uncertain why this street was so named.

A former resident understood that it was to be named Post Office Street, after the nearby, new post office in Albert Street but due to dissatisfaction with the new post office premises, it was decided to name it Bank Street after the nearby, bank in Church Street that had a grander appearance.

Bank Street was part of the development by the Rugby Freehold Land Society of the Moat Estate.

Barby Road

Rugby, off Hillmorton Road

see Notes column

SP 504749

Barby, Northampton-shire

It was the historic route between Rugby and Barby, known as the Barby Road.

Matthew Bloxam recalled that “…in 1813 on the Barby Road there was no house or building, except a barn or two, for a mile.”

In the 15th century this road was known as Fielden Street.

Barby is of Old Scandinavian (i.e. Viking) origin meaning ‘farmstead or village on the hill(s)’.

It probably started out as a bridle way. It was known as Watergate Street from the mid 18th cen to 1891 when it received its present name.

Barnaby Road

Rugby, off Technology Drive

2014

SP 504765

Barnaby Rudge

The hero of the eponymously entitled novel written by Charles Dickens in 1841.

The streets in this area of Rugby were given names associated with the works of Charles Dickens.

Barn Close

Houlton, off Handley Cross Avenue

2019

SP 556737

Barn Close was the name of a mediaeval farm field in Hillmorton

Land enclosures resulted in Barn Close having been incorporated in Handley Cross Farm by the time the farm was sold to the Government for the Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it and the further development of radio.

Barrington Road

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Frobisher Road

1960s

SP 481745

Samuel Barrington (1729 – 1800)

Admiral, RN (1787 – 90).

Apart from five years following the Treaty of Paris in 1763, most of his fifty year naval career from 1740 to 1790 was spent at sea.

A portrait of Barrington by Sir Joshua Reynolds can be seen at the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

Barton Road

Bilton, off Overslade Lane

1956

SP 490735

Clement Mervyn Barton (1885 – 1952)

Clement Barton resided at Red Lodge, Overslade Lane and owned the land on which Barton Road was built.

He was a former Army Captain and veterinary surgeon who, after WW1, devoted his life to breeding racehorses.

He is said to have been a partner of Capt Harry Rich and to have owned Handley Cross Farm when it was sold to the government for the Rugby Radio Station.

Bath Street

Rugby Town Centre, off Clifton Road

see Notes column

SP 507751

It was originally a narrow country lane, known as Bath Lane.

The lane is said to have been named from being the route taken by boys from Rugby School on their way to popular bathing places in the River Avon.

The lane was familiarly known as Pigstye Lane from the pig-houses on its eastern side at the town end.

It became a residential street from 1878.

Bawnmore Court

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1983

SP 486736

Bawnmore Road

Bawnmore Court has been named after the adjoining Bawnmore Road

Bawnmore Court has been built on part of of the estate that was formerly attached to Bilton Hall.

Bawnmore Road

 

Bilton, off The Green

 

1934

 

SP 484737

 

Bawnmore

 

Bawnmore was a large house on the east side of Overslade Lane near to its present junction with Bawnmore Road.

 

The estate attached to Bawnmore House was about 35 acres in area. The part of the present Bawnmore Road between Dunchurch Road and the junction with Overslade Lane was originally known as Featherbed Lane after the nearby Featherbed Farm.

Beaconsfield Avenue

Rugby, St Maries Estate, Off Churchill Road

1958

SP 502744

Benjamin Disraeli, 1st Earl of Beaconsfield, KG PC FSA (1804 – 81)

He was a British politician and writer. During his parliamentary career from 1837 to 1876, he held many political offices that included twice serving as Prime Minister. Following his ennoblement in 1876, he was Leader of the House of Lords until his death.

As he was ennobled late in life, he is better known as Disraeli.

Amongst his writings were 16 novels and several political non-fiction works including a political biography, the Life of Lord George Bentinck,

Beatty Drive

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Blackwood Avenue

1957

SP 486745

David Richard Beatty, 1st Earl Beatty, (1871 – 1936)

Admiral of the Fleet, RN (1919 – 27). He became 1st Sea Lord in 1919.

He was well known to residents of the town and district as he frequently visited “The Moat” in Church Street, Rugby, the home of his father, Captain David Longfield Beatty, whilst on holiday from the Navy.

He was buried in St Paul’s Cathedral, London.

Beckfoot Close

 

Brownsover, off Dunnerdale

 

1984

 

SP 517775

 

Beckfoot, Cumbria

 

Beckfoot is a coastal hamlet in the civil parish of Holme St Cuthbert, about 3 miles south of Siloth. It is about 25 miles to the west of the county town of Carlisle.

In the 2011 Census, Holme St Cuthbert parish had a population of 465.

 

Bell Road

Rugby, off Tecnology Drive

2016

SP 509763

Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922)

A G Bell was a teacher of deaf people and the inventor of the telephone. His patents of 1876 and 1877 became the fundamental telephone patents.

A G Bell was born in Edinburgh, but became a naturalized American citizen in 1874. After his success with the telephone, he interested himself in a wide range of topics.

Bell Walk

 

Hillmorton, off Wesley Road

 

 

SP 534738

 

Bell Inn, High Street, Hillmorton

 

The licensee of the Bell Inn, Mr Arnold Elliott, was also President of the National Association of Licensed Victuallers National Homes when they developed Bell Walk.

The homes in Bell Walk were built by the Association for Retired Publicans.

 

Belmont Road

Rugby, Rokeby Estate, off Kingsway

1938

SP 501740

Belmont House, Sidmouth, Devon.

 

Richard Henry Wood (1820 – 1908), moved from Rugby to Sidmouth in 1895 in order to take advantage of its mild climate.

On his retirement in 1874 from a Manchester business career, Mr Wood lived in Rugby until his removal to Devon.

(See also the Biographies section of this website.)

Richard Henry Wood’s generosity helped to provide the town of Rugby with the Hospital of St Cross and a public library in St Matthews Street.

Rokeby Estate was built on part of the former Rokeby Farm estate that he had owned.

 

Bennfield Road

 

Rugby, off West Leyes

 

1931

 

SP 499752

 

Bennfield House

 

Built in 1669 Bennfield House was the North Street family residence of the Benn family from 1813.

 

Bennfield House was demolished in 1930 and the site is now (2017) occupied by Barclays Bank. The ‘field’ in the name refers to land to the west of North Street, opposite, that was part of the house estate or gardens.

Benn Street

 

Rugby, off Cromwell Road

 

1905

 

SP 511745

 

George Charles Benn BA (1822-1895)

 

G C Benn was the youngest of five brothers, none of whom had married. As each of them died much of their wealth was passed on to the surviving brothers until George Charles Benn became the custodian of the family wealth and a very rich man.

They all made generous contributions to Rugby and neighbouring communities.

 

The road was laid out by the Rugby Freehold Land Society on Naseby’s Field which they purchased in 1902. 

Amongst his generosity to the town, George Benn defrayed the cost of the new tower and spire on St Andrew’s Church and also the erection of a school in Craven Road, (Benn School). He also bequeathed the “Shoulder of Mutton” and £6,000 to the Local Board of Health which was used by its successor, the Rugby Urban District Council, to erect the Benn Buildings in the High Street as its municipal offices. Today his memorial is the Benn Hall, adjoining the Town Hall.

Beswick Gardens

Bilton, off Bawnmore Road

1964

SP 487734

Joseph William Beswick (1888 – 1963)

Mayor of Rugby (1942-43); he was a member of the Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council, from 1925 until 1947.

By occupation, he was an engineer at the BTH in Rugby (1920 – 52). He was an active member of the Rotary Club in Rugby.

Beverly Close

Houlton, off Lincoln Drive

2023

SP 548735

Beverley Minster, the Parish Church of St John and St Martin for Beverley, in the East Riding of Yorkshire

Prior to the dissolution of the monasteries in 1548, Beverley Minster was originally a collegiate church of secular canons. It is one of the largest parish churches in the Country.

Beverly Close is one of a group of roads in the south of Houlton that were named after monasteries or minsters of the English church that were founded mainly during the conversion of the Anglo-Saxons in the seventh and eighth centuries.

It should be noted that the road name should have been spelt as Beverley Close as it was named after the town in the East Riding.

Biart Place

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1967

SP 516755

Douglas Edgar Biart (1894 – 1986)

Clerk to Rugby UDC (1928 – 32) & and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council (1932 – 54).

When he retired he was made an honorary freeman of the town.

A highlight of his career was his successful presentation in 1932 of the petition by Rugby UDC to a Privy Council enquiry for a Charter of Incorporation as a Municipal Borough.

Bilton Road

Rugby Town Centre, off Corporation Street

see ‘Reason’ column

SP 500750

Bilton Village

It was the historic route from Rugby to Bilton & onward to the County town of Warwick. It was part of the Rugby & Warwick Turnpike (1818 -78).

In the mid 18th cen. that part of Bilton Road running south west from its junction with Lawford Road to Oakfield (a large residence/preparatory school) was known as Warwick Street.

In the Domesday Book ‘Bilton’ was spelt either as Beltone or as Bentone. Its original meaning (Old English) was possibly “farmstead where henbane grows”.

Birch Drive

Bilton, off Mulberry Road

1988

SP 477746

Birch tree

A birch is a thin-leaved deciduous hardwood tree of the genus Betula.

Two species of the birch that are commonly found in the UK are Silver (Betula pendula) and Downy (Betula pubescens).

Birch Drive is one of a group of roads in Bilton, off Bilton Lane, that have been named after trees that can be seen in the UK.

Birch Ground Close

Houlton, off Great Brook Ground

2021

SP 542748

Near Birch Ground and Far Birch Ground were the names of mediaeval farm fields in Hillmorton.

Land enclosures resulted in Birch Ground Close having been incorporated in Normandy Farm by the time the farm was sold to the Government for the Radio Station.

The residential development of the former Rugby Radio Station has been given the name of Houlton and its streets named after people, events and equipment that were associated with it.

Blackberry Close

Brownsover, off Celandine

1989

SP 520776

Common Blackberry, Rubus fruticosus

In the British Isles the blackberry usually refers to the fruit that grows on the bramble bush. If left unchecked it grows abundantly throughout the UK.

Blackberry Close is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Blackman Way

Rugby, off Rounds Gardens

1994

SP 499755

Frank Blackman (1923-2002)

He had been a member of Rugby Borough Council for over 40 years. He was appointed an honorary freeman of the Borough in 1986.

His occupation had been an accountant with Alstom company.

Blackthorn Close

Brownsover, off Lower Lodge Avenue

2014

SP 510778

Blackthorn, Prunus speriosa

The blackthorn, also known as the sloe, is a small deciduous tree native to the UK and most of Europe. Its berries are used as a flavouring in sloe gin.

The roads in the area of Brownsover off Lower Lodge Avenue, to the west of Leicester Road, have been named after trees that can be seen in Britain.

Blackwood Avenue

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Addison Road

1958

SP 488745

Sir Henry Blackwood KCB, (1770 – 1832)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1825 – 32)

Captain of frigate Euryalus at Trafalgar, 1805.

There is a memorial tablet for him in the west aisle of the north transept of Westminster Cathedral.

Blake Close

Bilton, Admirals Estate, off Cunningham Way

1960s

SP 482745

Sir Geoffrey Blake KCB, (1882 – 1968)

Vice-Admiral, RN (1935 – 38)

In 1938 he retired early from active service due to ill health.

Bleaberry

 

Brownsover, off Copeland

 

1978

SP 511773

 

Bleaberry Tarn, Cumbria

 

Bleaberry Tarn lies in a corrie below the fells of Red Pike and High Stile. The stream Sour Milk Gill descends from the tarn to Buttermere.

 

Bleaberry is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

A tarn is a small lake in mountains, usually fomed by glaciers.

There is also a fell named Bleaberry with a height of 1,936 feet (590 m). It is on the main watershed between Thirlmere and Borrowdale.

Bloxam Gardens

Rugby, off Bilton Road

1938

SP 496748

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 – 88) – see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 – 88).

Until about 1990 the spelling on the street sign was ‘Bloxham’.

Matthew Bloxam lived in Rugby for all his life. He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health (1855 – 64) and was clerk to the Rugby Petty Sessions (1831 – 71)

Bloxam Place

Rugby, off Warwick Street

1934

SP 501750

Matthew Holbeche Bloxam (1805 – 88) – see also Biographies section of this website.

A local antiquarian & solicitor (1827 – 88)

Prior to 1934, Bloxam Place was a private, un-named road from 1842 adjoining Bloxam’s house in St Matthews Street.

Bluebell Close

Brownsover, off Celandine

1990

SP 520776

Common Bluebell, Hyacinthoides nonscripta

The common bluebell, ususally simply known in the UK as the bluebell, is a bulbous perennial plant, found in Atlantic areas from north-western Spain to the British Isles.

Bluebell Close is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Blyth Close

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2004

SP 475738

Charles Edward Blyth (1871-1940)

In 1911, Blyth took a 21 year lease of the Cawston House estate. In 1919 he purchased the property from its owner, the 1st Lord Waring, London art dealer and land speculator.

In 1925, the Cawston House estate was sold to the Hon. Kenneth Mackay, who later became Viscount Glenapp and the 2nd Earl of Inchcape.

Blyth was a member of Charles Nelson and Co Ltd, cement manufacturers of Stockton, Warwickshire.

Bond Street

New Bilton, off Bridget Street

(see also Reason column)

SP 496754

see ‘Notes’ column

Prior to 1949 it was named Bull Street after the builder, W H Bull of Northampton. The name change took place following a petition by the residents.

At the meeting of the Borough Council that approved this change of name, it was implied that the street was renamed after the famous London street as none of its residents would object to the new choice of name.

Bonnnington Close

Lower Hillmorton, off Constable Road

1966

SP 536741

Richard Parkes Bonington (1802 – 28)

English Romantic landscape painter. He spent most of his short life on the French Atlantic coast.

His landscapes were mostly of coastal scenes, with a low horizon and large sky. He died of TB in London.

The close has always been spelt with a ‘double-n’, contrary to the spelling of the artist’s name.

Borrowdale

 

Brownsover, off Grizedale

 

1976

SP 518775

 

Borrowdale, Cumbria

 

The civil parish of Borrowdale covers a considerable area south of Derwent Water in and around Borrowdale valley and includes several small settlements in the valley.

Borrowdale is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

In the 2011 Census the population of the parish of Borrowdale was 417.

Boswell Road

Rugby, off Tennyson Avenue

1959

SP 494731

James Boswell (1740 – 95)

Scottish lawyer, diarist and author.

He met Dr Samuel Johnson on several occasions and toured Scotland with him in 1763. His last meeting with Johnson was in 1784. His Life of Samuel Johnson, considered by many to be the most celebrated biography in the English language, was published in 1791.

Boughton Road

Brownsover, off Leicester Road

1916

SP 508772

The Boughton family.

The first known user of this surname was Thomas Boughton of Lawford during the fifteenth century.

The Boughtons were a long established Warwickshire family. A junior arm of this family, the Boughton-Leighs, resided at Brownsover Hall.

Boughton Road was built on part of the former Brownsover estate.

Boundary Road

Rugby, off Hillmorton Road

1932

SP 516745

The boundary of Rugby Parish

Boundary Road runs along part of the boundary line between Rugby & Hillmorton parishes.

Prior to the boundary changes of 1932, it was also on the boundary line of Rugby Urban District Council.

Bowen Road

Hillmorton Paddox Estate, off Hillmorton Road

1925

SP 510742

Charles John Bowen Cooke J P (1859 – 1920)

The developer of the road, the Rugby Freehold Land Society, named it after Bowen Cooke, a former president (1903 – 20).

He was also the running superintendent at Rugby of the L&NW Railway and from 1909 until his death was chief mechanical engineer of the L&NWR

Bow Fell

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1975

SP 517770

 

Bowfell Mountain, Cumbria

 

Bowfell lies in the centre of the Lake District in the Southern Fells area. At 2,959 feet (902 m), Bowfell is the sixth highest mountain in the Lake District.

Bow Fell is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The Ordnance Survey maps name the mountain as Bow Fell.

A fell is the local name for a mountain or hill.

Bracken Close

Bilton, off Bracken Drive

1983

SP 493742

Bracken, Pteridium aquilinum

Huge, widespread, ancient. Bracken is thought to be the most common plant in the world and is found on all continents except Antartica.

In the UK, it thrives in woodland

On the Woodlands estate, Bracken Close is one of a small group of roads that have been named after plants that grow on heathlands, moors and bogs in the UK.

Bracken Drive

Bilton, off Ferndown Road

1983

SP492743

Bracken, Pteridium aquilinum

The bracken is widely spread and its origins are ancient. It is thought to be the most common plant in the world and is found on all continents except Antartica.

In the UK, it thrives in woodland.

On the Woodlands estate, Bracken Drive is one of a small group of roads that have been named after plants that grow on heathlands, moors and bogsin the UK.

Brafield Leys

Rugby, off Norton Leys

1979

SP 501730

Brafield on the Green, a village south east of Northampton.

A ley (or lea) is a grass covered field, suitable for grazing animals.

The names of ‘The Leys’ were selected by the developers. Why they chose villages in Northamptonshire is not known.

Brambling Close

Brownsover, off Coton Park Drive

2001

SP 514780

Brambling – Fringilla montifringilla

The brambling is a medium-small member of the finch family that is a winter visitor to Britain from northern Europe.

The roads off Coton Park Drive, Brownsover, have been named after British birds.

Brand Road

Rugby, off Projects Drive

2010

SP 509768

Brands Hatch Circuit, Fawkham, Longfield, Kent.

Brands Hatch Circuit hosts racing of motor cars, motor cycles and trucks.

Brand Road is one of the roads near to, and off Projects Drive that is named after motor sport venues in the UK.

Braunston Place

 

Rugby, off Percival Road

 

1936

SP 516737

 

Braunston, Northamptonshire

 

Braunston is a village to the east of Rugby just within the Northants boundary. In 2011 it had a population of 1,759.

 

Braunston is of early Saxon origin and is recorded in the Domesday Book as Brandestone. The original meaning of the name was “farmstead of a man called Brant”.

Braunston became an important canal centre on the through route between the North and London, following a junction being made there in 1803 between the Oxford and Grand Junction canals.

Bridge Street

Rugby, off Sun Street.

1900

SP 514754

This street name refers to the road bridge that crosses the former Great Central Railway (later part of the LNER).

The road bridge connects Sun Street with Rokeby Street.

Although this line closed as a through route between the north and London in September 1966, the section between Rugby and Nottingham continued as a local branch providing a DMU passenger service until May 1969.

Bridle Lane

Rugby

       

See Whitehall Lane

Brindley Road

Hillmorton, off Lower Street

1966

SP 534742

James Brindley (1716 – 72)

A millwright, he became prominent as a builder of many of the early English canals. One of these was the Oxford Canal which passes near Rugby, although he died before it was completed

Brindley Road leads, via The Locks (qv), to a flight of three, doubled, locks on the Oxford Canal and some old buildings which were the local depot of the canal engineering department.

Brodie Close

Rugby, off Hopps Lodge Drive

2006

SP 515749

Francis Brodie Lodge (1880-1967)

Brodie Lodge was one of the founders of Lodge Plugs Ltd. For 45 years, until his retirement, he was managing director of the company. In 1913 he was joined by Bernard Hopps as a joint mangaing director.

Brodie Close is one of three residential roads that were erected on the former site of the Lodge Plugs factory in St Peters Road when Morgan Matroc Ltd moved production to a new factory in Central Park Drive, Brownsover.

Bronte Close

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1995

SP 514751

Charlotte, Emily and Anne Brontë (1816 – 55, 1818 – 48, 1820 – 49, respectively)

These sisters were renowned English novelists and poets.

A memorial tablet for the three sisters is in Poets Corner, Westminster Abbey.

Bronte Close is on former site of the Rugby High School for Girls, which named one of its school houses after the sisters.

Brooklime Drive

Brownsover, off Campion Way

1991

SP 521775

The brooklime or European speedwell, Veronica beccabunga

Brooklime is a succulent herbaceous perrenial plant. It grows on the margins of brooks and ditches in Europe, North Africa, and north and western Asia. It can be found on other continents as an introduced species.

Brooklime Drive is one of a group of roads in an area adjoining the north of Newton Manor Lane, centered around Campion Way, that are named after wild plants and flowers that can be seen in the British Isles.

Broom Close

Bilton, off Bracken Drive

 

1983

SP 492742

Broom, Cytisus scoparius

Broom is a large shrub of heaths, open woodlands and coastal habitats. Like Gorse, it has bright yellow flowers, but it doesn’t have any spines, and smells of vanilla.

On the Woodlands estate Broom Close is one of a small group of roads that have been named after plants that grow on heathlands, moors and bogs in the UK.

Browning Road

Hillmorton, Low Hills Estate, off Mellor Road

1961

SP 539738

Charles William Browning MBE (1880 – 1947)

He was a member of the Rugby Urban District Council and its successor, the Rugby Borough Council, from 1923 to 1945. He became mayor of Rugby (1936 – 37) and was also an alderman of both the Rugby Borough and Warwickshire County Councils.

He was the first Labour mayor, having been a trade union official and plasterer.

As part of his contribution to the town and the county he served on many public service committees.

Brownsover Mill Road

Rugby & Brownsover

       

See Murray Road and Mill Road

Bruce Williams Way

Rugby, off Hillmorton Road

1989

SP 508749

Winton Wilbert (‘Bruce’) Williams MBE (1933-95)

‘Bruce’ Williams worked in Rugby to improve community relations. He and his elder brother, Don Williams, set up the West Indian Community Association.

When ‘Bruce’ Williams migrated from Jamaica in 1960.he worked as a mechanic for the Post Office.

As Bruce Williams Way is simple and access road to the Ken Marriott Sports Centre through Whitehall Recreation Ground, it has no residential buildings.

Brudenell Close

Cawston, off Turchill Road

2002

SP 472736

George Brudenell, 1st Duke of Montagu (2nd creation) KG, PC, FRS (1712-90)

In 1730 he married Lady Mary, Montagu, daughter of John Montagu, 2nd Duke of Montagu (1st creation). In 1749 they inherited the estates of the 2nd Duke, including Cawston and George assumed the surname “Montagu”. In 1766 he was created Duke of Montagu, a title which had become extinct with the death of his father-in-law.

He became the 4th Earl of Cardigan on the death of his father in 1732. On his death, only his daughters survived him, and thus the Dukedom again became extinct.

Much of his personal estate passed to his daughter, Elizabeth, who, in 1767, had married Henry, 2nd Duke of Buccleuch.

Buchanan Road

Rugby, off Bilton Road

1937

SP 492745

David Buchanan BA (1830-1900)

He was a nationally known cricketer, having played for the Gentlemen of England and the All England Eleven. He was also a founder member & the first Captain of Warwickshire County Cricket Club (1882 – 83).

He was an elected member of the Local Board of Health and its successor, the Rugby Urban District Council (1881 – 99). Amongst his other local activities he was a player and officer of the Rugby Cricket Club and an officer of the Rugby Lawn Tennis Club.

Bucknill Crescent

Hillmorton, off Chamberlain Road

1939

SP 535735

John Townsend Bucknill (1843-1935)

The Bucknill family was well known in Rugby from the 1780s. J T Bucknill became Lord of the Manor of Hillmorton when he inherited Hillmorton Hall in 1889 from his mother, Mary Anne Bucknill.

In 1864 he had been gazetted as a lieutenant in the Royal Engineers, and spent much of his military career at the War Office, finally retiring in 1887 due to deafness, with the honorary rank of Lieutenant-Co;onel.

Bucknill Crescent was one road of a Hillmorton estate laid out in 1937 by the Borough Council. This group of roads were all given names after people or organisations associated with the village.

Although he was Lord of the Manor of Hillmorton, his main residence appears to have been at Thornfield House, Thornefield Bitterne, near Southampton.

Bull Street

New Bilton        

See Bond Street

Burnside

Rugby, off Westfield Road

1938

SP 496746

 

It is presumed that it was so named because of the brook (or ‘burn’) that ran through the Westfield estate.

The road was built on the 31½ acre estate attached to Westfield House in Bilton Road.

Among the former owners of the estate was Richard Pennington (1799 – 1885), a retired cotton manufacturer and merchant.

Butlers Leap

Rugby, off Clifton Road

see Notes column

SP 521759

Named after a Rugby School boy named Arthur Gray Butler, (1832-1909) son of the Rev Dr Butler of Gayton, Northants.

The boy is famed for jumping clear over Clifton Brook in 1849 where it was crossed by the Clifton Road. The road and brook were re-aligned in 1906, thereby preventing similar ‘leaps’ in modern times.

 

The road named Butler’s Leap runs through several industrial estates and has no residences.

Butlin Road

Rugby, off Clifton Road

1920

SP 518754

Butlin family

Following the death of her husband, William Butlin (1730 – 91), a draper, Ann Butlin (1743 – 1826) acquired a banking business from Samuel Clay and re-named it Butlins Bank.

Ann Butlin’s eldest child, William (1773 – 1837), managed the bank until his death. The Bank was then inherited by William’s youngest sister, Maria Benn, née Butlin, (1787 – 1881) and passed into the ownership of the Benn family. (see also Benn Street.)

It was sold to the Lloyds Banking Company in 1868.

Buttermere

 

Brownsover, off Hawlands

 

1975

SP 519770

 

Buttermere village and lake, Cumbria

 

The village of Buttermere lies between the lakes of Buttermere and Crummock Water and has the summit of Grasmoor to the north. Buttermere lake is quite small, being just 1¼ miles long by a ¼ mile wide and 75 feet deep.

Buttermere is one of the roads in Brownsover that was named after a place or feature in the Lake District National Park.

The civil parish of Buttermere, which extends for a considerable area around the village, had a population of 121 in the 2011 Census.